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i dont know why the list returned is NULL, this is the code:

In my List.h

struct nodo_ {
    char* dato;

    struct nodo_ *next;
};
struct nodo_ *Lista;
/*Def list */
void createList(struct nodo_ **Lista);

in my main.c

struct nodo_ *Lista;

int main(){
    createList(Lista);
    while(Lista != NULL){        
         printf("The date is %s\n  ",Lista->dato); //Error here now
         Lisa = Lista->next;
    }

    return 0 ;
}

in my List.c im create the List :

void createList(struct nodo_ *Lista){
    struct nodo_ *Aux_List = list_D;
    aux_List = malloc(sizeof(struct nodo_));

    char* path_a = "Hello"; 
    char* path_B = "Minasan";

    /* Store */
    aux_List->dato = path_a;
    aux_List = Aux_List->next;    
    aux_List = malloc(sizeof(struct nodo_));
    aux_List->dato = path_b;
    aux_List->next = NULL;

}

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
this shouldnt compile. you have auxList and then use aux_List with an underscore –  Gir Aug 11 '12 at 21:08
    
please stop changing your obviously non-compilable code into slightly different non-compilable code and just post what you actually have. –  Useless Aug 11 '12 at 21:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

That pointer is being passed by value, i.e., a copy is made. If you wish to initialize the pointer to a completely new value then you must use another level of indirection (i.e., a nodo_**).

On a side note, typedefing pointer types is almost always a bad idea unless the type is truly opaque (which yours is not). One reason for this "rule" is evident when you consider another bug in your code:

auxList = (Lista*)malloc(sizeof(Lista));

You're allocating space for a pointer to noda_, not enough for a noda_ object. Also, don't cast the return value of malloc in C. It is redundant as a void* is safely and implicitly converted to any other pointer type and, if you forget to include stdlib.h, malloc will be assumed to be a function which returns int, and the cast hides the error. (only applies to compilers which implement C89 or an older version)

EDIT:

To initialize a pointer argument within a function:

void init(struct node **n) {
    if(n)
        *n = malloc(sizeof(struct node));
}

int main() {
    struct node *n;
    init(&n);
}
share|improve this answer
    
auxList = (struct nodo_*)malloc(sizeof(struct nodo_)); Now i dont have Warning Ty. But i dont understand how can initialize the pointer with another level of indirection. –  Sark Aug 11 '12 at 21:09
    
@user1558736: So first, remove that cast. Your initialization function must take a _nodo**, i.e., a pointer to pointer to _nodo. Then... *ptr = malloc(sizeof(struct nodo_)); –  Ed S. Aug 11 '12 at 21:12
    
I would add that list_D is a global unintialised variable and as such is placed in the BSS section, which is set to all zeros as the OS creates the process. That's why the initial value of list_D is NULL and passing it by value to createList doesn't change it. –  Hristo Iliev Aug 11 '12 at 21:14
    
Fixed malloc , i cant understand how to use _nodo** .. any can give me an example? –  Sark Aug 11 '12 at 21:21
    
@user1558736: I did in the comment... but I can post a more full example. –  Ed S. Aug 11 '12 at 21:22

Short answer to your actual question before I dig into the code:

... why the list returned is NULL ...

There is no returned list, you neither use return to pass a result, nor set the value of an out parameter.

In your edited code:

void createList(struct nodo_ **Lista){
    struct nodo_ *Aux_List = list_D;
    aux_List = malloc(sizeof(struct nodo_));

you first set Aux_List to the current value of Lista, which you know isn't initialized yet, because you're trying to initialize it. Then you discard that value, overwriting aux_List with a new address returned by malloc. You never store anything into *Lista, which would be the only way for this function to work as declared.


As Ed suggests, your typedef is hiding lots of useful information from you, so let's expand it out

struct nodo {
    char* dato;

    struct nodo *next;
};

/*Def list */
void createList(struct nodo* list_D);

Now, you can see this createList is wrong: you can pass in the head node of a list (which is no use to it anyway), but there is no way for it to return a newly-allocated list to the caller.

Frankly your createList isn't a useful primitive anyway, so I'm going to start with a sensible foundation first:

struct nodo *alloc_nodo(char *dato, struct nodo *next)
{
    struct nodo *n = malloc(sizeof(*n));
    n->dato = dato;
    n->next = next;
    return n;
}

Now, before we re-write your createList using this, let's see what it does now:

void createList(struct nodo *list_D)
{
    struct nodo *aux_List = list_D;
    aux_List = malloc(sizeof(struct nodo_));
    /* ^ so, we take the input argument and immediately discard it */

    char* path_a = "Hello"; 
    char* path_B = "Minasan";

    /* Store */
    aux_List->dato = path_a;
    aux_List = Aux_List->next;
    /* ^ note that we haven't initialized aux_List->next yet,
       so this is a random pointer value */

    aux_List = malloc(sizeof(struct nodo_));
    /* again, we set aux_List to something,
       but immediately overwrite and discard it */

    aux_List->dato = path_b;
    aux_List->next = NULL;
}

So, it ignores its input, returns no output, and leaks two partially-initialized nodes which aren't connected to each other. I believe you wanted to achieve something more like this:

struct nodo* create_my_list()
{
    struct nodo *tail = alloc_nodo("Minasan", NULL);
    /* the end (tail) of the linked list has a NULL next pointer */

    struct nodo *head = alloc_nodo("Hello", tail);
    /* the head of the linked list points to the next node */

    return head;
    /* like a snake, you hold a singly-linked list by the head */
}

If we write main to use this function now, it looks like:

int main()
{
    struct nodo *head = create_my_list();
    struct nodo *n;
    for (n = head; n != NULL; n = n->next)
    {
         printf("The date is %s\n  ", n->dato);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I do : printf("%s",Lista->dato) in main; Segmentation fault –  Sark Aug 11 '12 at 21:53
    
I'm trying to tell you that you never correctly initialized wither Lista or Aux_List. That's why, when you examine the contents of a variable, you find it has not been initialized. And, when you dereference an uninitialized pointer, you're likely to crash. –  Useless Aug 11 '12 at 21:56
    
I see , ty for helping! –  Sark Aug 11 '12 at 22:06

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