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I'm stuck on a mock exam question. I created a class called Power which allowed a number to be raised to any power.

The third part of the question asks me to create another class BoundedPower which would extend Power. I was given the MAX-X variable (x cannot exceed this value) and told that the BoundedPower class must: behave like the Power class, use a constructor and use thepowN method.

My code is below, i am not sure what to do to make the BoundedPower class work.

public class Power {

    private double x = 0;

    Power(double x) {
        this.x = x;
    }

    public double getX() {
        return x;
    }

    public double powN(int n) {

        double result = 1.0;
        for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
            result = result * x;
        }
        return result;

    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Power p = new Power(5.0);
        double d = p.powN(3);
        System.out.println(d);
    }

}


public class BoundedPower extends Power {

    public static final double MAX_X = 1000000;

    // invariant: x <= MAX_X

    Power x;

    BoundedPower(double x) {
        super(x);
        // this.x=x; x is private in Power class

    }

    public double powN(int n) {

        if (x.getX() > MAX_X) {

            return 0;
        } else {

            double result = 1.0;
            for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
                result = result * getX();
            }
            return result;
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        BoundedPower bp = new BoundedPower(5);
        double test = bp.powN(4);
        System.out.println(test);
    }

}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted
public class BoundedPower extends Power {

  public static final double MAX_X = 1000000;

  BoundedPower(double x) {
    super(x);
  }

   public double powN(int n) {

     if (x.getX() > MAX_X) {
      return 0;
     } else {
      return super.powN(n);
     }
   }

   public static void main(String[] args) {

   BoundedPower bp = new BoundedPower(5);
   double test = bp.powN(4);
   System.out.println(test);
 }
} 

You don't have to copy your computation formular to the subclass (just call super.powN(..)). You also don't need another instance of Power within BoundedPower.

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Thats a lot easier, i'll bear that in mind for next time. Thanks –  nsc010 Aug 11 '12 at 22:08

There is no need for that instance Power variable x in your class. Any BoundedPower instance IS a Power instance, and as such, to reference a method from Power, do super.blah(), so for x.getX(), do super.getX()

Also, in your comments, you said this.x=x fails because its private. When you do the super call, it calls the constructor of the superclass (Power), which sets x there, so there is no need for this.x=x

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Yeah it works now, it was the super.getX(), i forgot to use the super call. The super call in the constructor also makes sense. Thanks for clearing that up –  nsc010 Aug 11 '12 at 22:04

This is probably what they had in mind:

public class Power {
 public double powN(double x, int n) {
    double result = 1.0;
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        result = result * x;
    }
    return result;
  }
}

public class BoundedPower extends Power {
  private final double maxX;

  public BoundedPower(double maxX) {
    this.maxX = maxX;
  }

  public double powN(double x, int n) {
    if (x > maxX) {
      throw new IllegalArgumentException("x value [" + x + "] " + 
        "greater than expected max [" + maxX + "]");
    }
    return super.powN(x, n);
  }
}
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I would do it in a different way. From what you're saying the BoundedPower class makes sense only for a bounded x (up to MAX_X).

Consequently, I would not allow the creation of an object with an x greater than MAX_X (i.e. a BoundedPower object cannot exist for unbounded x's)

So the implementation would be exactly as the the Power implementation excepting the way you build BoundedPower instances : you first check whether it makes sense to build it

  public class BoundedPower extends Power {

        private static final double MAX_X = 1000000; //makes no sense to be public

        public static BoundedPower newBoundedPower(int n)
                                   throws IllegalNumberException{

               if(x > MAX_X) throw new IllegalNumberException();
               return new BoundedPower(x);
        }

        private BoundedPower(double x) {
               super(x);
        }
  }
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