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I am to write a test program that tests various operations on the class as designed in a previous problem; showing the definition of clockType overloading as member functions. I get the following error when I compile it using Dev C++ compiler.

The error reads:

[link error] undefined reference "WinMain@16'
Id returned 1 exit status

This is my code:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class clockType
{
public:
      void setTime (int hours, int minutes, int seconds);
      void getTime (int& hours, int& minutes, int& seconds) const;     
      clockType operator++();
      bool operator==(const clockType& otherClock) const;
      bool operator!= (const clockType& otherClock) const;
      bool operator<=(const clockType& otherClock) const;
      bool operator<(const clockType& otherClock) const;
      bool operator>=(const clockType& otherClock) const;
      bool operator>(const clockType& otherClock) const;
      clockType ();
      clockType (int hours = 0, int minutes = 0, int seconds = 0);
private:
        int hr;
        int min;
        int sec;
};
clockType clockType::operator++()
{
          sec++;
          if (sec > 59)
          {
                  sec = 0;
                  min++;
                  if (min > 59)
                  {
                          min = 0;
                          hr++;
                          if (hr > 23)
                          hr = 0;
                  }
          }
          return *this;
}
bool clockType::operator==(const clockType& otherClock) const
{
     return (hr == otherClock.hr && min == otherClock.min && sec == otherClock.sec);
}
bool clockType::operator<=(const clockType& otherClock) const
{
     return ((hr < otherClock.hr) || (hr == otherClock.hr && min < otherClock.min) || (hr == otherClock.hr && min == otherClock.min && sec <= otherClock.sec));
}
bool clockType::operator!=(const clockType& otherClock) const
{
          return (hr != otherClock.hr || min != otherClock.min || sec != otherClock.sec);
}
bool clockType::operator<(const clockType& otherClock) const
{
     return ((hr < otherClock.hr) || (hr == otherClock.hr && min < otherClock.min) || (hr == otherClock.hr && min == otherClock.min && sec < otherClock.sec));
}
bool clockType::operator>=(const clockType& otherClock) const
{
     return ((hr > otherClock.hr) || (hr == otherClock.hr && min > otherClock.min) || (hr == otherClock.hr && min == otherClock.min && sec >= otherClock.sec));
}
bool clockType::operator>(const clockType& otherClock) const
{
     return ((hr > otherClock.hr) || (hr == otherClock.hr && min > otherClock.min) || (hr == otherClock.hr && min == otherClock.min && sec > otherClock.sec));
}

void clockType::setTime(int hours, int minutes, int seconds)
{
     if (0 <= hours && hours < 24)
     hr = hours;
     else
     hr = 0;
     if (0 <= minutes && minutes < 60)
     min = minutes;
     else
     min = 0;
     if (0 <= seconds && seconds < 60)
     sec = seconds;
     else
     sec = 0;
}
void clockType::getTime(int& hours, int& minutes, int& seconds)const
{
   hours = hr;
   minutes = min;
   seconds = sec;
}
clockType::clockType(int hours, int minutes, int seconds)
{
 setTime(hours, minutes, seconds);
}

Any help on this matter would be greatly appreciated. I am not real good at programming, and I just can't find out why I would be getting this type of error. I haven't on my other programs that I have written for class thus far.

share|improve this question
    
How are you building your program? It sounds like you're missing a main() function. –  Carl Norum Aug 11 '12 at 23:26
    
There is no such C++ compiler as DevC++. –  user405725 Aug 11 '12 at 23:32
    
Do you mean Visual Studio instead fo DevC++? –  Joce Aug 11 '12 at 23:36
    
@Joce: He means gcc. But sadly, he doesn't really know it... –  user405725 Aug 11 '12 at 23:38
    
Please avoid the Dev-C++ if you're using the original Bloodshed version. It's out of date and hugely problematic at the very least. The related tag wiki does provide more information. –  Bart Aug 12 '12 at 10:18
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3 Answers 3

It is not a compiler but a linking error, it says that the linker is trying to find the main function (to provide the entry point for a Windows application).

The compilation itself does work well (the linking step works after the compilation is successful).

share|improve this answer
    
Okay, I get what you are saying about it being a linking error, and when I was searching for answers before I did see the "int main () { return 0; } part, however, this is an example from my book and it does not use the int main in the book...In a case like above where would I apply that portion, I tried it in various spots and got a different errors. –  user1592770 Aug 12 '12 at 0:05
    
You write a class and compile it; it gets translated into machine code. That machine code can end as part of a library (static .lib or dynamic .dll/.so), or as a a program. In the case of a program, it needs the entry point that is defined by the main. To get a library or program from the machine code you have to pass the required parameters to the linker (I do not recall which were to specify either, it has been a long time since I have used C++ and mostly the IDEs do simplify them) –  SJuan76 Aug 12 '12 at 0:42
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There absolutely is an IDE called Dev-C++ made by the company Bloodshed, I believe it is discontinued but still fairly compatible and favoured as it is free and easy to use with a nice interface.

As to the OP's question, you need to be sure you have an application entry point, in your project settings (I haven't used Dev-C++ in years so take a look around), you will find something saying application type, the options listed will be something like

Console Application
GUI Application or maybe Win32 Application
Static Library
Dynamic Library

These are all different types of applications and it looks like by default your program has the Win32 Application setting, in this case the linker is looking for WinMain however you have not provided one in your project, if you wish for a simple console application change the application type to that setting, which will require a simple main function, examples of the application entry point functions for both Win32 and Console are

int WINAPI WinMain(HINSTANCE hInstance, HINSTANCE hPrevInstance, LPSTR lpCmdLine, int iShow)
{
return 0;
}

Or for a simple Console Application

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
return 0;
}

These functions are where you need to plug in the rest of your application in order for it to do anything, without this entry point your application cannot even be properly compiled and linked.

An example of making your application actually use your class (without using any functions)

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
   clockType  myClockType;
   myClockType.setTime(12, 30, 45);

   return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Dev-C++ is the opposite of favoured. It's a hideous abomination that nobody should ever be stuck with. –  Puppy Aug 12 '12 at 14:47
    
That's an opinion, Dev-C++ may be outdated but it is a very well built IDE with a great addon package system, good auto-completion, and at one point good compatibility. Just saying it is an abomination without a reason is not a good answer. –  user1294021 Aug 16 '12 at 2:41
    
They did a good job creating an alternative IDE for use on Windows, I would love to see your IDE that you have built and how good it is. Dev-C++ was also the easiest to use with GTK on Windows however as it never get's built any more I imagine it will completely fall out of the scope of usability. –  user1294021 Aug 16 '12 at 2:43
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You are missing the int main() function. A class doesn't really compile into a program by itself, you could compile it into a DLL, but not into a executable without the main function. More specifically, the program will compile, but the linker is complaining a it needs to have an entry point for the program.

If you put this at the bottom of your program: however this merely causes the undefined reference to go away.

int main(){
    return 0;
}

In order to actually test your program, you will need to run some tests, maybe something like this:

#include <iostream>

// your class code here.

int main(){
    Clocktype clock;
    clock.setTime(15, 42, 13);
    int h, m, s;
    clock.getTime(&h, &m, &s);
    std::cout << h << m << s << std::endl;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your suggested solution is correct in that it will make the error go away, but it will just cause more problems for the OP, since his program still won't do anything. –  Carl Norum Aug 11 '12 at 23:32
    
That is true, let me update it. –  Link Aug 11 '12 at 23:42
    
Okay, now I see what I was missing, I am actually missing the whole executable program! Where it would actually take the variables that are assigned and run them through the tests! Thanks, I knew I shouldn't be getting something like that but I wasn't really with it enough to figure the why for. thanks. –  user1592770 Aug 12 '12 at 0:10
    
No problem, happens to me Quite a bit too. –  Link Aug 12 '12 at 0:23
    
Uh, &h, &m, &s? For references? –  Puppy Aug 12 '12 at 10:17
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