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What am I doing wrong here?

I have a .social div, but on the first one I want zero padding on the top, and on the second one I want no bottom border.

I have attempted to create classes for this first and last but I think I've got it wrong somewhere:

.social {
width:330px;
height:75px;
float:right;
text-align:left;
padding:10px 0;
border-bottom:dotted 1px #6d6d6d;
}

.social .first{padding-top:0;}

.social .last{border:0;}

And the HTML

<div class="social" class="first">
    <div class="socialIcon"><img src="images/facebook.png" alt="Facebook" /></div>
    <div class="socialText">Find me on Facebook</div>
</div>

I'm guessing it's not possible to have two different classes? If so how can I do this?

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2  
I created a simple example to demonstrate the difference between the descendent selector and the double-class selector: jsfiddle.net/jyAyX. Also, see developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/CSS/Getting_Started/Selectors. –  AlexMA Aug 11 '12 at 23:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 78 down vote accepted

If you want two classes on one element, do it this way:

<div class="social first"></div>

Reference it in css like so:

.social.first {}
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4  
Thanks, wasn't aware I could double up like that :) Good to know for the future! –  Francesca Aug 11 '12 at 23:32

If you only have two items, you can do this:

.social {
    width: 330px;
    height: 75px;
    float: right;
    text-align: left;
    padding: 10px 0;
    border: none;
}

.social:first-child { 
    padding-top:0;
    border-bottom: dotted 1px #6d6d6d;
}
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If you want to apply styles only to an element which is its parents' first child, is it better to use :first-child pseudo-class

.social:first-child{
    border-bottom: dotted 1px #6d6d6d;
    padding-top: 0;
}
.social{
    border: 0;
    width: 330px;
    height: 75px;
    float: right;
    text-align: left;
    padding: 10px 0;
}

Then, the rule .social has both common styles and the last element's styles.

And .social:first-child overrides them with first element's styles.

You could also use :last-child selector, but :first-childis more supported by old browsers: see https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/CSS/:first-child#Browser_compatibility and https://developer.mozilla.org/es/docs/CSS/:last-child#Browser_compatibility.

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You can try this:

HTML

<div class="social">
    <div class="socialIcon"><img src="images/facebook.png" alt="Facebook" /></div>
    <div class="socialText">Find me on Facebook</div>
</div>

CSS CODE

.social {
  width:330px;
  height:75px;
  float:right;
  text-align:left;
  padding:10px 0;
  border-bottom:dotted 1px #6d6d6d;
}
.social .socialIcon{
  padding-top:0;
}
.social .socialText{
  border:0;
}

To add multiple class in the same element you can use the following format:

<div class="class1 class2 class3"></div>

DEMO

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