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I want to use a simple countdown timer starting at 30 seconds from when the function is run and ending at 0. No milliseconds. How can it be coded?

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closed as not constructive by rlemon, gnat, Troy Alford, karthikr, M M. Mar 22 '13 at 20:20

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I've edited my answer to display the time in a paragraph :) –  Click Upvote Jul 28 '09 at 13:17
31  
The answers to this question have been constructive to me. Closing questions like this feels like a pedantic exercise that doesn't actually make Stack Overflow any better. Seeing a variety of approaches to a general problem is an excellent way to learn how to solve this problem. –  Hairgami_Master Jan 13 at 17:35

6 Answers 6

var count=30;

var counter=setInterval(timer, 1000); //1000 will  run it every 1 second

function timer()
{
  count=count-1;
  if (count <= 0)
  {
     clearInterval(counter);
     //counter ended, do something here
     return;
  }

  //Do code for showing the number of seconds here
}

To make the code for the timer appear in a paragraph (or anywhere else on the page), just put the line:

<span id="timer"></span>

where you want the seconds to appear. Then insert the following line in your timer() function, so it looks like this:

function timer()
{
  count=count-1;
  if (count <= 0)
  {
     clearInterval(counter);
     return;
  }

 document.getElementById("timer").innerHTML=count + " secs"; // watch for spelling
}
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Thanks for the answer. I am having difficulty using it because my timer appears in a paragraph. How can I put the 30, 29, 28, etc. in the middle of a paragraph? –  Mike Jul 28 '09 at 5:58
1  
I edited my answer to show you how to display the timer in the paragraph :) –  Click Upvote Jul 28 '09 at 13:17
1  
In the middle of a paragraph (horizontally) : <p id="timer" style="text-align:center"></p> –  Alsciende Jul 28 '09 at 13:19
    
Click, your timer will only display "0 secs". You should put the innerHTML update after the decrementation, not in the end case. –  Alsciende Jul 28 '09 at 13:24
1  
perfect countdown example for many plugins, thanks.. –  Barlas Apaydin Jul 4 '12 at 21:19

I wrote this script some time ago:

Usage:

var myCounter = new Countdown({  
    seconds:5,  // number of seconds to count down
    onUpdateStatus: function(sec){console.log(sec);}, // callback for each second
    onCounterEnd: function(){ alert('counter ended!');} // final action
});

myCounter.start();


function Countdown(options) {
  var timer,
  instance = this,
  seconds = options.seconds || 10,
  updateStatus = options.onUpdateStatus || function () {},
  counterEnd = options.onCounterEnd || function () {};

  function decrementCounter() {
    updateStatus(seconds);
    if (seconds === 0) {
      counterEnd();
      instance.stop();
    }
    seconds--;
  }

  this.start = function () {
    clearInterval(timer);
    timer = 0;
    seconds = options.seconds;
    timer = setInterval(decrementCounter, 1000);
  };

  this.stop = function () {
    clearInterval(timer);
  };
}
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This is wicked man, great solution. –  jyoseph Aug 16 '13 at 16:36
    
very very nice piece of code –  tcardoso Apr 25 at 0:48
    
I would love to use this instead of the other's. When I was stuck to restart the starting number, I see this is working nicely.. –  Oki Erie Rinaldi Jul 7 at 8:49

So far the answers seem to rely on code being run instantly. If you set a timer for 1000ms, it will actually be around 1008 instead.

Here is how you should do it:

function timer(time,update,complete) {
    var start = new Date().getTime();
    var interval = setInterval(function() {
        var now = time-(new Date().getTime()-start);
        if( now <= 0) {
            clearInterval(interval);
            complete();
        }
        else update(Math.floor(now/1000));
    },100); // the smaller this number, the more accurate the timer will be
}

To use, call:

timer(
    5000, // milliseconds
    function(timeleft) { // called every step to update the visible countdown
        document.getElementById('timer').innerHTML = timeleft+" second(s)";
    },
    function() { // what to do after
        alert("Timer complete!");
    }
);
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Here is another one if anyone needs one for minutes and seconds:

    var mins = 10;  //Set the number of minutes you need
    var secs = mins * 60;
    var currentSeconds = 0;
    var currentMinutes = 0;
    setTimeout('Decrement()',1000);

    function Decrement() {
        currentMinutes = Math.floor(secs / 60);
        currentSeconds = secs % 60;
        if(currentSeconds <= 9) currentSeconds = "0" + currentSeconds;
        secs--;
        document.getElementById("timerText").innerHTML = currentMinutes + ":" + currentSeconds; //Set the element id you need the time put into.
        if(secs !== -1) setTimeout('Decrement()',1000);
    }
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Exactly what I was looking for. :) Thanks. –  Rishabh Shah Jun 24 at 17:57

This jQuery plugin is excellent, highly configurable and extremely robust.

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yes i confirm this is a good plugins & robust :) –  ucefkh Dec 25 '12 at 12:19
    <head>
<script LANGUAGE="JavaScript">
<!--
// Javascript Countdown
// Version 1.01 6/7/07 (1/20/2000)
// by TDavid at http://www.tdscripts.com/
var now = new Date();
var theevent = new Date("Sep 29 2007 00:00:01");
var seconds = (theevent - now) / 1000;
var minutes = seconds / 60;
var hours = minutes / 60;
var days = hours / 24;
ID=window.setTimeout("update();", 1000);
function update() {
now = new Date();
seconds = (theevent - now) / 1000;
seconds = Math.round(seconds);
minutes = seconds / 60;
minutes = Math.round(minutes);
hours = minutes / 60;
hours = Math.round(hours);
days = hours / 24;
days = Math.round(days);
document.form1.days.value = days;
document.form1.hours.value = hours;
document.form1.minutes.value = minutes;
document.form1.seconds.value = seconds;
ID=window.setTimeout("update();",1000);
}
// --></script>
</head>
<body>

<p><font face="Arial" size="3">Countdown To January 31, 2000, at 12:00: </font></p>
<form name="form1"><p>Days <input type="text" name="days" value="0" size="3"> Hours
<input type="text" name="hours" value="0" size="4"> Minutes <input type="text" name="minutes" value="0"
size="7"> Seconds <input type="text" name="seconds" value="0" size="7"> </p>
</form>

</body>
</html>
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4  
This script uses very bad practices from the 90's. And also 1.5 hours is not 2 hours. It's 1 hour 30 min. You should use Math.floor, not Math.round –  corbacho Feb 27 '13 at 15:01

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