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In R, what's an efficient way to extract the integers from ranges?

Let's say I have a matrix of ranges (column1=start, column2=end)

1   5
3   6
10  13

I would like to store the encompassing unique integers of all the ranges in the matrix into an object:

1
2
3
4
5
6
10
11
12
13

This would be applied to a matrix containing ~4 million ranges, so hopefully someone can offer a solution that is somewhat efficient.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I don't know that it is particularly efficient, but if your matrix of ranges is ranges then the following should work:

unique(unlist(apply(ranges, 1, function(x) x[1]:x[2])))
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Suppose you had start = 3, end = 7, and you'd marked each as a '1' on a number line starting at 1

starts:     0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...
ends + 1:   0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 ...

The cumulative sum of the starts minus the cumulative sum of the ends, and the difference between the two, is

cumsum(starts):   0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ...
cumsum(ends + 1): 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 ...
diff:             0 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 0

and the locations of the 1's in the diff are

which(diff > 0): 3 4 5 6 7

Use tabulate to allow for multiple starts / ends at the same location, and

range2 <- function(ranges)
{
    max <- max(ranges)
    starts <- tabulate(ranges[,1], max)
    ends <- tabulate(ranges[,2] + 1L, max)
    which(cumsum(starts) - cumsum(ends) > 0L)
}

For the question, this gives

> eg <- matrix(c(1, 3, 10, 5, 6, 13), 3)
> range2(eg)
 [1]  1  2  3  4  5  6 10 11 12 13

It is pretty fast, for Andrie's example

 > system.time(runs <- range2(xx))
   user  system elapsed 
  0.108   0.000   0.111 

(this sounds a bit like DNA sequence analysis, for which GenomicRanges might be your friend; you'd use the coverage and slice functions on reads, perhaps input with readGappedAlignments).

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That is significantly faster than the other two solutions. Impressive. –  seancarmody Aug 12 '12 at 10:32
    
+1 Brilliant... –  Andrie Aug 12 '12 at 12:16

Use sequence and rep:

x <- matrix(c(1, 5, 3, 6, 10, 13), ncol=2, byrow=TRUE)

ranges <- function(x){
  len <- x[, 2] - x[, 1] + 1
  #allocate space
  a <- b <- vector("numeric", sum(len))
  a <- rep(x[, 1], len) 
  b <- sequence(len)-1
  unique(a+b)
}

ranges(x)
[1]  1  2  3  4  5  6 10 11 12 13

Since this makes use of only vectorised code, this should be quite fast, even for large data sets. On my machine an input matrix of 1 million rows takes ~5 seconds to run:

set.seed(1)
xx <- sample(1e6, 1e6)
xx <- matrix(c(xx, xx+sample(1:100, 1e6, replace=TRUE)), ncol=2)
str(xx)
 int [1:1000000, 1:2] 265509 372124 572853 908206 201682 898386 944670 660794 629110 61786 ...

system.time(zz <- ranges(xx))
user  system elapsed 
   4.33    0.78    5.22 

str(zz)
num [1:51470518] 265509 265510 265511 265512 265513 ...
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I think that the OP wants the result to feature each integer only once. –  seancarmody Aug 12 '12 at 2:33
    
I've compared the timing: my answer is definitely slower to run! –  seancarmody Aug 12 '12 at 2:42
    
@seancarmody Thank you for highlighting the requirement for unique integers. I'll edit my answer. –  Andrie Aug 12 '12 at 2:47
    
That's not really 'efficient' though, is it? Its more a brute-force approach. Suppose your sequences were typically 100,000 in length, you'd have to generate a 100,000x1,000,000 matrix, and unique would then throw away something like 99% of it. An efficient (especially in terms of big-O notation) way would involve some tree structure, I reckon... –  Spacedman Aug 12 '12 at 8:27
    
@Spacedman You are quite correct - and my lack of compsci training shows :-). I was referring to efficiency in the sense of vectorised code, but that clearly isn't as efficient as it could be. –  Andrie Aug 12 '12 at 9:44

Is it not something as simple as:

x <- matrix(c(1, 5, 3, 6, 10, 13), ncol=2, byrow=TRUE)
do.call(":",as.list(range(x)))
[1]  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12 13

Edit

Looks like I got the wrong end of the stick, but my answer can be modified to use union, although this is just a wrapper for unique:

Reduce("union",apply(x,1,function(y) do.call(":",as.list(y))))
[1]  1  2  3  4  5  6 10 11 12 13
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Note that in the OP, 7, 8 and 9 do not appear in the desired result. The idea is to return the union of each of the ranges not the full range from the lowest to the highest in the whole matrix. –  seancarmody Aug 12 '12 at 10:25
    
@seancarmody Ah, I see, I misunderstood, then your answer is the correct one on the lines of what I was thinking. I'll delete this –  James Aug 12 '12 at 10:32
1  
Actually, I found a way to modify it. Not vastly different, but another option for completeness –  James Aug 12 '12 at 10:46

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