Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I have the implementation of MyUnitClass declared like so:

@implementation MyUnitClass
Unit* _unit = NULL;

In a for loop I am iterating a number of times and creating multiple instances of MyUnitClass. Unit is behaving like a static variable. I have a breakpoint set inside the init method of MyUnitClass and this is what I get each time the class is initalized:

(gdb) print _unit
$4 = (Unit *) 0x112340
(gdb) print _unit
$5 = (Unit *) 0x112340

NOTE:

I have already solved the issue by moving the variables into the @interface declaration. If you answer the question, it would be great to see a link to a page where this info can be found.

share|improve this question
2  
Objective-C does not have member variables; it has instance variables. More or less the same thing, but consistency of naming helps. – bbum Aug 12 '12 at 6:05
up vote 3 down vote accepted

As Richard pointed out, the absence of the braces defines the var as a global. In terms of declaring instance variables, there are a couple of approaches:

In the Objective-C Programming Language there is discussion of declaration of instance variables either in the @interface or the @implementation.

So, you can define an instance variable x in the @interface, which is the most common place you historically will have seen instance variables defined:

@interface TestClass : NSObject
{
    NSInteger x;
}
@end

@implementation TestClass

// define the methods

@end

As the above link describes, though, you can also define it in your @implementation (though, as a matter of convention, I don't think you'll see this very often):

@interface TestClass : NSObject

@end

@implementation TestClass
{
    NSInteger x;
}

// define the methods

@end

There is actually a third place you can put your instance variables, in class extensions (discussed later in the same document). In practice, this means you can have your .h defined as follows

// TestClass.h

@interface TestClass : NSObject

// define public properties and methods here

@end

and your .m as follows:

// TestClass.m

// this is the class extension

@interface TestClass ()
{
    NSInteger x;
}
@end

// this is the implementation

@implementation TestClass

// define the methods

@end

This last approach (a .h with @interface, a .m with class extension and the @implementation) is now the format that the Xcode templates use when you create a new class. In practice, this means that you can put your public declarations in the .h file, and put your private @property and instance variables in the class extension. It just makes your code a little cleaner, keeping you from cluttering your .h file (which is in effect your public interface to your class) with private implementation details. For instance variables, perhaps the previous technique of defining your instance variables in the @implementation is equivalent, but I don't think that works with @property declarations, in which case the class extension becomes useful.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually Xcode only uses the class extension variant if you have a subclass of a UIKit element, like UIViewController. But, seeing as how many people only ever subclass that in their apps, it's a quite easy mistake to make. – Richard J. Ross III Aug 12 '12 at 13:22
    
@RichardJ.RossIII Ah, it only automatically adds a blank class extension for UIKit subclasses? I hadn't noticed that. But, obviously, you can use class extensions for any class you want. – Rob Aug 12 '12 at 14:11

It's because you didn't surround the variable with curly braces, making it a global. To fix, try defining it like this:

@implementation MyObject {
   unsigned int myVar;
}

// rest of implementation

@end

There can only be one @implementation block, so if it is already declared in the .h file, then the members would need to be added there or the entire block would need to be moved to the .m file.

This is a remnant from C, and the compiler doesn't quite know that you want it to be an iVar, not a global.

share|improve this answer
    
I've seen this type of notation as well (out side of implementation curly braces): @synthesize preferences =__preferences. I guess in this case it's a plain old member and NOT a global. – Brian Aug 12 '12 at 1:02
    
@rhooligan The @synthesize is slightly different, a property implementation directive. To quote from the Objective-C Programming Language: "You use the @synthesize directive to tell the compiler that it should synthesize the setter and/or getter methods for a property if you do not supply them within the @implementation block. The @synthesize directive also synthesizes an appropriate instance variable if it is not otherwise declared." – Rob Aug 12 '12 at 9:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.