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Given a bunch of integers, I want to convert them to base n and for each bit, add the bits up and mod them by n.

Example: Let n = 3, and suppose I want to add the bits mod 3 in 4, 4, 4, 2. These numbers in base 3 is 11, 11, 11, 02. The least significant bit adds up to 1 + 1 + 1 + 2 = 5 = 2 mod 3. The second least significant bit adds up to 1 + 1 + 1 + 0 = 3 = 0 mod 3. The answer is then 02 base 3 = 2. Alternatively, if we didn't convert to base 3 before the addition, and just did it in binary, we have 100, 100, 100, 010. The resulting bits from least significant to most significant is: 0 + 0 + 0 + 0 = 0 mod 3, 0 + 0 + 0 + 1 = 1 mod 3, 1 + 1 + 1 + 0 = 0 mod 3, so the answer is 010 = 2.

The case where n = 2 is pretty easy, you can just XOR everything. Is there a way to generalize this?

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So by bit you mean n-ary digit? –  phs Aug 12 '12 at 1:25
    
sorry i am not sure what you mean. can you clarify? –  Popcorn Aug 12 '12 at 1:27
1  
To be technical, if it isn't base 2, they are just digits, not 'bits' (BInary digiTS) –  Scott Hunter Aug 12 '12 at 1:27
1  
Your question appears to use one base for representation and one base for modulo. The last example uses base 3 for the concatenation step and base 2 for the interpretation step. That happened to work here, but it won't work for all cases. Was it an oversight? Should the answer have been 110 = 6? –  cldellow Aug 12 '12 at 1:58
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's a ditty in ruby:

#! /usr/bin/env ruby

def naryxor(n, terms)
  puts "Calculating the #{n}-ary XOR of #{terms.join(", ")}..."
  raise "Negative terms are forbidden" if terms.any? { |i| i < 0 }
  xor = []                    # "Digits" of our n-ary xor result

  done = false
  while not done
    done = true               # Assume we're done until proven otherwise
    xor.insert(0, 0)          # Insert a new total digit at the front

    terms = terms.select { |i| i > 0 }.collect do |i|
      done = false            # Not all remaining terms were zero

      digit = i % n           # Find the least n-ary digit
      rest = (i - digit) / n  # shift it off
      xor[0] += digit         # add it to our xor

      rest                    # Replace this integer with its remainder
    end

    xor[0] %= n               # Take the mod once, after summing.
  end

  xor[1..-1]                  # Drop untouched leading digit
end

raise "Usage: ./naryxor.rb arity term term..." if ARGV.size <= 1
puts naryxor(ARGV[0].to_i, ARGV[1..-1].collect(&:to_i)).join("")

Running it:

$ ./naryxor.rb 3 4 4 4 2
Calculating the 3-ary XOR of 4, 4, 4, 2...
02

This is just expands the n-ary representations of the passed integers and does the dumb thing. If n were taken to be a power of two, we could do some more interesting bit-twiddles to avoid the integer divisions, but you gave no such guarantee.

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I don't think there's a mathematical property that leads to an efficient general short-cut. The reason XOR works for base 2 is because XOR has the convenient property of being an addition with carry discard.

A simple recursive function can apply the algorithm, e.g. taking advantage of Scala's BigInt class for base conversion:

def sums(radix: Int, digits: List[List[String]]): String =
  if(digits exists { _.nonEmpty }) // there's at least 1 bit left to add
    (digits.flatMap { _.headOption } // take the 1st bit of all numbers
      .map { BigInt(_, radix) } // convert to int representation
      .sum
      .toInt % radix // modulo by base
    ).toString +
    sums(radix, digits map { _.drop(1) }) // do next most significant bit
  else 
    "" // base case: no digits left to add

def sum(radix: Int, ns: List[Int]): Int =
  BigInt(
    sums(
      radix,
      ns // use BigInt to convert from int representation to string 
        .map { BigInt(_) }
        .map { _.toString(radix).split("").drop(1).toList.reverse }
    )
    .reverse,
    radix
  ).toInt

scala> sum(3, List(4,4,4,2))
res0: Int = 2

Your question is tagged 'performance' but doesn't lay out any additional constraints about memory or runtime to inform an improved approach.

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