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So I have a random javascript array of names...

[@larry,@nicholas,@notch] etc.

They all start with the @ symbol. I'd like to sort them by the Levenshtein Distance so that the the ones at the top of the list are closest to the search term. At the moment, I have some javascript that uses jQuery's .grep() on it using javascript .match() method around the entered search term on key press:

(code edited since first publish)

limitArr = $.grep(imTheCallback, function(n){
    return n.match(searchy.toLowerCase())
});
modArr = limitArr.sort(levenshtein(searchy.toLowerCase(), 50))
if (modArr[0].substr(0, 1) == '@') {
    if (atRes.childred('div').length < 6) {
        modArr.forEach(function(i){
            atRes.append('<div class="oneResult">' + i + '</div>');
        });
    }
} else if (modArr[0].substr(0, 1) == '#') {
    if (tagRes.children('div').length < 6) {
        modArr.forEach(function(i){
            tagRes.append('<div class="oneResult">' + i + '</div>');
        });
    }
}

$('.oneResult:first-child').addClass('active');

$('.oneResult').click(function(){
    window.location.href = 'http://hashtag.ly/' + $(this).html();
});

It also has some if statements detecting if the array contains hashtags (#) or mentions (@). Ignore that. The imTheCallback is the array of names, either hashtags or mentions, then modArr is the array sorted. Then the .atResults and .tagResults elements are the elements that it appends each time in the array to, this forms a list of names based on the entered search terms.

I also have the Levenshtein Distance algorithm:

var levenshtein = function(min, split) {
    // Levenshtein Algorithm Revisited - WebReflection
    try {
        split = !("0")[0]
    } catch(i) {
        split = true
    };

    return function(a, b) {
        if (a == b)
            return 0;
        if (!a.length || !b.length)
            return b.length || a.length;
        if (split) {
            a = a.split("");
            b = b.split("")
        };
        var len1 = a.length + 1,
            len2 = b.length + 1,
            I = 0,
            i = 0,
            d = [[0]],
            c, j, J;
        while (++i < len2)
            d[0][i] = i;
        i = 0;
        while (++i < len1) {
            J = j = 0;
            c = a[I];
            d[i] = [i];
            while(++j < len2) {
                d[i][j] = min(d[I][j] + 1, d[i][J] + 1, d[I][J] + (c != b[J]));
                ++J;
            };
            ++I;
        };
        return d[len1 - 1][len2 - 1];
    }
}(Math.min, false);

How can I work with algorithm (or a similar one) into my current code to sort it without bad performance?

UPDATE:

So I'm now using James Westgate's Lev Dist function. Works WAYYYY fast. So performance is solved, the issue now is using it with source...

modArr = limitArr.sort(function(a, b){
    levDist(a, searchy)
    levDist(b, searchy)
});

My problem now is general understanding on using the .sort() method. Help is appreciated, thanks.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
2  
If it's an array, why are you iterating with for..in? That will also iterate over the length property (or any other non-index property of the array, if you defined such), and inherited enumerable properties (which might exist if some of your other code tries to polyfill the ES5 array methods). You can iterate arrays with the native .forEach, or jQuery's $.each. –  Šime Vidas Aug 12 '12 at 1:44
1  
@amnotiam I love writing such comments, whether someone reads them or not :) –  Šime Vidas Aug 12 '12 at 2:34
1  
modArr = limitArr.sort(function(a,b){ return levDist(b,searchy) - levDist(a,searchy); }); –  James Westgate Aug 21 '12 at 11:41
1  
@JamesWestgate to the rescue again. (Note: that will sort in ascending order of similarity, which might not be the order you want; to sort in descending order of likeness, use function(a,b){ return levDist(a, searchy) - levDist(b,searchy); }.) –  Jordan Gray Aug 22 '12 at 0:10
2  
Yeah, and you may want to cache the result depending on the size of the array as it may do the same calculation multiple times. Just a simple associative array would do the trick. –  James Westgate Aug 22 '12 at 9:17

6 Answers 6

up vote 53 down vote accepted
+50

I wrote an inline spell checker a few years ago and implemented a Levenshtein algorithm - since it was inline and for IE8 I did quite a lot of performance optimisation.

//http://www.merriampark.com/ld.htm, http://www.mgilleland.com/ld/ldjavascript.htm, Damerau–Levenshtein distance (Wikipedia)
var levDist = function(s, t) {
    var d = []; //2d matrix

    // Step 1
    var n = s.length;
    var m = t.length;

    if (n == 0) return m;
    if (m == 0) return n;

    //Create an array of arrays in javascript (a descending loop is quicker)
    for (var i = n; i >= 0; i--) d[i] = [];

    // Step 2
    for (var i = n; i >= 0; i--) d[i][0] = i;
    for (var j = m; j >= 0; j--) d[0][j] = j;

    // Step 3
    for (var i = 1; i <= n; i++) {
        var s_i = s.charAt(i - 1);

        // Step 4
        for (var j = 1; j <= m; j++) {

            //Check the jagged ld total so far
            if (i == j && d[i][j] > 4) return n;

            var t_j = t.charAt(j - 1);
            var cost = (s_i == t_j) ? 0 : 1; // Step 5

            //Calculate the minimum
            var mi = d[i - 1][j] + 1;
            var b = d[i][j - 1] + 1;
            var c = d[i - 1][j - 1] + cost;

            if (b < mi) mi = b;
            if (c < mi) mi = c;

            d[i][j] = mi; // Step 6

            //Damerau transposition
            if (i > 1 && j > 1 && s_i == t.charAt(j - 2) && s.charAt(i - 2) == t_j) {
                d[i][j] = Math.min(d[i][j], d[i - 2][j - 2] + cost);
            }
        }
    }

    // Step 7
    return d[n][m];
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I haven't gone through the code, but I've done a quick test and can verify that this is significantly faster than the OP's algorithm. Nice work! –  Jordan Gray Aug 15 '12 at 13:57
2  
One little thing: I notice that this is the Damerau–Levenshtein distance you calculate rather than just the Levenshtein distance. If you cut out the test for transpositions, this will be closer to what the OP wants and will run even faster. :) –  Jordan Gray Aug 15 '12 at 15:48
2  
Fun fact, the var keyword serves an actual purpose and isn't a reset button. –  AlienWebguy Aug 18 '12 at 5:40
1  
Thank you! This is honestly the only good performance function I've seen on the web. All the others get really slow on long string, this is fantastic. Well done. claps hands –  Jackson Gariety Aug 18 '12 at 16:54
2  
If you set a limit, and you take out DT, then the performance flies. jsperf.com/levenshtein-distance/2 Note: my original implementation had buckets of items sorted alphabetically, then each letter of the alphabet also had a bucket by length, in that way I could compare items only of the same length or lengths up to a limit without the check inside the algorithm. –  James Westgate Aug 23 '12 at 10:23

I came to this solution:

var levenshtein = (function() {
        var row2 = [];
        return function(s1, s2) {
            if (s1 === s2) {
                return 0;
            } else {
                var s1_len = s1.length, s2_len = s2.length;
                if (s1_len && s2_len) {
                    var i1 = 0, i2 = 0, a, b, c, c2, row = row2;
                    while (i1 < s1_len)
                        row[i1] = ++i1;
                    while (i2 < s2_len) {
                        c2 = s2.charCodeAt(i2);
                        a = i2;
                        ++i2;
                        b = i2;
                        for (i1 = 0; i1 < s1_len; ++i1) {
                            c = a + (s1.charCodeAt(i1) === c2 ? 0 : 1);
                            a = row[i1];
                            b = b < a ? (b < c ? b + 1 : c) : (a < c ? a + 1 : c);
                            row[i1] = b;
                        }
                    }
                    return b;
                } else {
                    return s1_len + s2_len;
                }
            }
        };
})();

See also http://jsperf.com/levenshtein-distance/12

Most speed was gained by eliminating some array usages.

share|improve this answer

Updated: http://jsperf.com/levenshtein-distance/5

The new Revision annihilates all other benchmarks. I was specifically chasing Chromium/Firefox performance as I don't have an IE8/9/10 test environment, but the optimisations made should apply in general to most browsers.

Levenshtein Distance

The matrix to perform Levenshtein Distance can be reused again and again. This was an obvious target for optimisation (but be careful, this now imposes a limit on string length (unless you were to resize the matrix dynamically)).

The only option for optimisation not pursued in jsPerf Revision 5 is memoisation. Depending on your use of Levenshtein Distance, this could help drastically but was omitted due to its implementation specific nature.

// Cache the matrix. Note this implementation is limited to
// strings of 64 char or less. This could be altered to update
// dynamically, or a larger value could be used.
var matrix = [];
for (var i = 0; i < 64; i++) {
    matrix[i] = [i];
    matrix[i].length = 64;
}
for (var i = 0; i < 64; i++) {
    matrix[0][i] = i;
}

// Functional implementation of Levenshtein Distance.
String.levenshteinDistance = function(__this, that, limit) {
    var thisLength = __this.length, thatLength = that.length;

    if (Math.abs(thisLength - thatLength) > (limit || 32)) return limit || 32;
    if (thisLength === 0) return thatLength;
    if (thatLength === 0) return thisLength;

    // Calculate matrix.
    var this_i, that_j, cost, min, t;
    for (i = 1; i <= thisLength; ++i) {
        this_i = __this[i-1];

        for (j = 1; j <= thatLength; ++j) {
            // Check the jagged ld total so far
            if (i === j && matrix[i][j] > 4) return thisLength;

            that_j = that[j-1];
            cost = (this_i === that_j) ? 0 : 1;  // Chars already match, no ++op to count.
            // Calculate the minimum (much faster than Math.min(...)).
            min    = matrix[i - 1][j    ] + 1;                      // Deletion.
            if ((t = matrix[i    ][j - 1] + 1   ) < min) min = t;   // Insertion.
            if ((t = matrix[i - 1][j - 1] + cost) < min) min = t;   // Substitution.

            matrix[i][j] = min; // Update matrix.
        }
    }

    return matrix[thisLength][thatLength];
};

Damerau-Levenshtein Distance

jsperf.com/damerau-levenshtein-distance

Damerau-Levenshtein Distance is a small modification to Levenshtein Distance to include transpositions. There is very little to optimise.

// Damerau transposition.
if (i > 1 && j > 1 && this_i === that[j-2] && this[i-2] === that_j
&& (t = matrix[i-2][j-2]+cost) < matrix[i][j]) matrix[i][j] = t;

Sorting Algorithm

The second part of this answer is to choose an appropriate sort function. I will upload optimised sort functions to http://jsperf.com/sort soon.

share|improve this answer
    
Welcome to Stack Overflow! Thanks for your post! Please do not use signatures/taglines in your posts. Your user box counts as your signature, and you can use your profile to post any information about yourself you like. FAQ on signatures/taglines –  Andrew Barber Feb 21 '13 at 21:11
    
Hi! Sorry, my mistake... I assumed stackoverflow was going to post my message under "anonymous" or "guest"... I see it has created a pseudo account... guess I'll register fully. –  TheSpanishInquisition Feb 21 '13 at 21:40
    
No worries at all! Thanks! –  Andrew Barber Feb 21 '13 at 21:42
    
This looks cool. I'm going to have to check it out sometime. –  James Westgate Jul 26 '13 at 10:49
    
Hi, the prototype methods you include are bound to be slower so I cannot see their relevance in these tests. –  StuR Jul 30 '13 at 13:41

I would definitely suggest using a better Levenshtein method like the one in @James Westgate's answer.

That said, DOM manipulations are often a great expense. You can certainly improve your jQuery usage.

Your loops are rather small in the example above, but concatenating the generated html for each oneResult into a single string and doing one append at the end of the loop will be much more efficient.

Your selectors are slow. $('.oneResult') will search all elements in the DOM and test their className in older IE browsers. You may want to consider something like atRes.find('.oneResult') to scope the search.

In the case of adding the click handlers, we may want to do one better avoid setting handlers on every keyup. You could leverage event delegation by setting a single handler on atRest for all results in the same block you are setting the keyup handler:

atRest.on('click', '.oneResult', function(){
  window.location.href = 'http://hashtag.ly/' + $(this).html();
});

See http://api.jquery.com/on/ for more info.

share|improve this answer

The obvious way of doing this is to map each string to a (distance, string) pair, then sort this list, then drop the distances again. This way you ensure the levenstein distance only has to be computed once. Maybe merge duplicates first, too.

share|improve this answer

I just wrote an new revision: http://jsperf.com/levenshtein-algorithms/16

This revision is faster than the other ones. Works even on IE =)

share|improve this answer
    
Well, I removed the -1. Click the link and see, @axrwkr. Still, it should be at least mentioned here... –  icedwater Aug 26 '13 at 10:29

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