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I've been working on enhancing this webpage and I'm sure you'll all laugh when you see the following code, but I've been teaching myself javascript as I go, so I'm a little proud of how far I've been able to get on my own. The problem is that what I've done is a little bit buggy once you start clicking on several cities on the map and I'm not versed enough to figure it out. Also, I'm sure I've taken the long scenic route in getting the code to function so I'm turning to all-knowing community in hopes someone can teach this guy how to code.

You can see the full development here: http://buhmanphotography.com/map/

Here is a video of the bugs I'm seeing: http://buhmanphotography.com/map/buggyCode/

$(document).ready(function() {
        // Show the Map Container
        $('.locBox a').click(function (e) {

            // Initialize info for clicked location
            var initLocInfo = $(this).attr("rel") + "Ctn";

            // Show Initial Information
            $('#' + initLocInfo).show();
            $('#' + initLocInfo).css('opacity','1');
            $('#' + initLocInfo).addClass('modActive'); 


            // Initialize Button State on Map
            var initLocBtn = $(this).attr("rel") + "Btn";
            $('#' + initLocBtn).css('backgroundPosition','top');

            // Open Map Box
            $("#mapModalCtn").show();
            $("#mapModalCtn").animate({
                opacity: 1
            }, 500);
            e.preventDefault();
        });

        // Hide the Map Container
        $('#modalTitle a').click(function (e) {
            $("#mapModalCtn").animate({
                opacity: 0
            }, 500, function() {
                $("#mapModalCtn").hide();
                $('#modLeftCol > div').removeClass('modActive');
                $('#modLeftCol > div').hide();
                $('#modRightCol a').css('backgroundPosition','bottom');
            });
            e.preventDefault();
        });

        // Show the info for the selected Location on the Map
        $('#modRightCol a').click(function (e) {
            e.preventDefault();
            var locInfo = $(this).attr("rel") + "Ctn";
            var locBtn = $(this).attr("rel") + "Btn";

            // Change Map Location Button State
            $('#modRightCol a').css('backgroundPosition','bottom');
            $(this).css('backgroundPosition','top');

            // Hide currently visible information
            if ($('#modLeftCol > div').hasClass('modActive')) {
                $("#modLeftCol > div").animate({
                    opacity: 0
                }, 500, function(){
                     $("#modLeftCol > div").hide();
                     $("#modLeftCol > div").removeClass('modActive');

                     //Show information related to location clicked
                    $('#' + locInfo).show();
                    $('#' + locInfo).animate({
                            opacity: 1
                        }, 500, function(){
                            $('#' + locInfo).addClass('modActive');
                        });
                });
            }


        });

    });
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closed as too localized by Corbin, Jared Farrish, Ken White, Ohgodwhy, DCoder Aug 12 '12 at 6:12

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
5  
This might be better suited for codereview.stackexchange.com, but in the mean time (further to Jared's comment) you can chain jQuery methods: $('#'+initLocInfo).show().css('opacity','1').addClass('modActive'); (more efficient then repeatedly selecting the same element(s)). Regarding your comment "what I've done is a little bit buggy" - you need to be more specific. –  nnnnnn Aug 12 '12 at 2:08
    
thanks for the link. I didn't know there was a special review area. When I say its buggy, after a few clicks on the different cities on the map, it'll do this weird thing where the title on the left side, flashes back and forth between the previous selection and the selection I just made. I'm wondering if it's a timing issue - If I hit another city before the previous script completes or something like that. I see it in both Safari and Firefox. –  lbweb Aug 12 '12 at 4:09
    
Here is a video of what I'm experiencing: buhmanphotography.com/map/buggyCode –  lbweb Aug 12 '12 at 5:56

1 Answer 1

Need help fixing bugs and optimizing javascript code

I am going to give you some general advice. In general it is better to get something working before you worry about something being perfectly efficient. That doesn't mean you should purposely do things in a sloppy inefficient way but correctness should be more important than something being optimized.

You can go back through your code and optimize it after you have it working. I have found that if I focus too hard on making something efficient ( before I complete it ) I will never get it done!

As far as making your code better a good rule of thumb is to cache things.

For example do:

var container = $('#container');
container.css({ ‘background-color’ : ‘#f00’});
container.bind(‘click’, function() { do something });

Instead of:

$(‘#container’).css({‘background-color’ : ‘#f00’});
$(‘#container’).bind(‘click’, function() { do something });

Everytime you do $(‘someElement’) it takes time. It has to search the entire DOM to find that element. If you are going to be referencing this DOM element often it is better to save a reference to this element and use this reference. Thus removing all these unnecessary lookups.

Another thing to think about using is jquery’s delegates when possible. Delegates are good if you have a lot of click listeners inside the same area.

For example rather then adding a click listener on all the links in your .locBox class:

$('.locBox a').click(function (e) {

Do something like this:

$(‘.locBox’).delegate(‘a’, ‘click’, function() { … do something … });

This is good because now you will only have one listener on each .locBox and it will wait for a click on your link tags to bubble up then run the event handler.

I know this doesn’t address your “buggy” behaviour but I think you will find this useful for future projects.

share|improve this answer
    
I can't thank you enough for all this. Even though you don't have anything for me on the bugs, you still taught me a lot and for that I'll be forever appreciative. I wouldn't be surprised if it's all the DOM element calls that is making it flip out anyway. –  lbweb Aug 12 '12 at 5:02
    
very good advice on delegate, hope I can still use $(this) in function, so only a little code need to be changed. –  Eric Yin Aug 12 '12 at 6:01

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