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I am trying to write a function that will set the first argument to the value of the second argument. However, when the second argument is a container class, I want it to set the first argument to the first element of the container. I found this question which answers a similar problem, however, I can not seem to get it to work in my case.

When I compile this code I get an error saying that SetVar is ambiguous. Is there anyway to get the functionality working?

Here is my code so far...

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
template<typename T1,typename T2>
static void SetVar(T1& a, const T2 &b, typename  T2::const_iterator= T2().begin()){
    //Check to make sure b contains an element.
    if(b.begin()!=b.end())  a=*b.begin();
}
template<typename T1,typename T2>
static void SetVar(T1& a, const T2 &b,...){
    a=b;
}
int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    int x;
    int y=5;
    std::vector<int> z;
    z.push_back(1);
    z.push_back(3);
    SetVar(x, y);
    //Should print 5
    std::cout<<x<<"\n";

    SetVar(x, z);//<---SetVar is ambiguous
    //Should print 1
    std::cout<<x<<"\n";
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Passing argument to an ellipsis does make a function overload less preferred than one that has an actual parameter for the same argument, but that doesn't come up here because there is no third argument in your calls.

I would use enable_if for both:

#include <type_traits>

// Enabled if T2 has `const_iterator` and `begin()`:
template<typename T1,typename T2>
auto SetVar(T1& a, const T2 &b)
  -> typename std::enable_if<std::is_convertible<
         decltype(std::declval<const T2&>().begin()),
         typename T2::const_iterator>::value
     >::type
{
    //Check to make sure b contains an element.
    if(b.begin()!=b.end())  a=*b.begin();
}

// Enabled if expression 'a=b' is valid.
template<typename T1,typename T2>
auto SetVar(T1& a, const T2 &b)
  -> typename std::enable_if<std::is_assignable<T1, const T2&>::value>::type
{
    a=b;
}

It's still possible for the above to be ambiguous, but only if both conditions are true, which means a weird container or implicit conversion is going on - and in that case I would want the compiler to warn me of the confusion.

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent solution, however is there any way to get this to work without features from C++11? – Skyler Saleh Aug 12 '12 at 2:50
    
Yes, I think everything from std:: I used has been in Boost a while, and you can move the return types to get rid of the auto and trailing-return-types. – aschepler Aug 12 '12 at 2:52
    
Thanks @LucDanton for the fixes. I know, I should try these things out before submitting. – aschepler Aug 12 '12 at 2:54

function template cannot do specialization. this is why

share|improve this answer
    
-1 That is simply incorrect. Non member template functions can be specialized, just not partially specialized. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc163754.aspx#S2 – Skyler Saleh Aug 12 '12 at 2:40
1  
And this was not a specialization at all. It's just an overload. A specialization declaration always has two sets of <> template parameter lists. – aschepler Aug 12 '12 at 2:44
    
@aschepler I will admit I used the wrong term, I should have used overload. – Skyler Saleh Aug 12 '12 at 2:47

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