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I have the following piece of code for handling exceptions in my web application:

application.Response.Clear();
application.Response.Status = Constants.HttpServerError;
application.Response.TrySkipIisCustomErrors = true;

LogApplicationException(application.Response, exception);
try
{
    WriteViewResponse(exception);
}
// now we're in trouble. lets be as graceful as possible.
catch (Exception exceptionWritingView)
{
    // Exception wrapper = ??
    WriteGracefulResponse(exceptionWritingView);
}
finally
{
    application.Server.ClearError();
}

The issue here is that if there's an exception while attempting to render the response as a ViewResult, I'm "suppressing" the original exception (in the View anyways), and just displaying what caused the error ViewResult to throw.

I'd like taking both exception and exceptionWritingView and make one exception with both, with exceptionWritingView at the top.

This would be:

exceptionWritingView
    -> inner exceptions of exceptionWritingView
            -> original exception that raised the unhandled exception handler
                       -> its inner exceptions

But I can't set the InnerException property on my exception object. So how could I achieve this?

At "best" I could create a new Exception using new Exception(exceptionWritingView.Message, exception), but I'd be losing parts of the StackTrace plus I'd be losing any InnerExceptions the exceptionWritingView could've had.

Is reflection the only way out here? Would it be that horrible to do it with reflection?

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In Java you call initCause() with the old exception (or just pass it to the constructor of the new exception. I'm not sure about C#. –  Antimony Aug 12 '12 at 3:41
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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can use System.AggregateException.

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definitely the cleanliest option. –  Nico Aug 12 '12 at 15:18
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You don't set the inner exception through the setter, you set it through the constructor.

application.Response.Clear();
application.Response.Status = Constants.HttpServerError;
application.Response.TrySkipIisCustomErrors = true;

LogApplicationException(application.Response, exception);
try
{
    WriteViewResponse(exception);
}
// now we're in trouble. lets be as graceful as possible.
catch (Exception exceptionWritingView)
{
    // Example on how to nest exceptions.
    throw MyException("Error message", exceptionWritingView);
}
finally
{
    application.Server.ClearError();
}

Your stack trace will be saved in the inner exception.

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1  
that's not helping me, I need the full exception and the full exceptionWritingView –  Nico Aug 12 '12 at 4:34
    
I'm not sure how using inner exceptions isn't helping. You can reference the original exception by using the InnerException Property. Try reading this: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173163.aspx –  Jeff Vanzella Aug 12 '12 at 4:39
    
I Get it...In the WriteViewResponse method I'm assuming you have a throw Exception? That is the point that you would try { [statement] } catch (Exception ex) { throw new Exception("my error message", ex) } –  Jeff Vanzella Aug 12 '12 at 4:42
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Why to make things complicated? Why not pass exception as a parameter into WriteGracefulResponse method?

...
// now we're in trouble. lets be as graceful as possible. 
catch (Exception exceptionWritingView) 
{ 
   // Exception wrapper = ?? 
   WriteGracefulResponse(exception, exceptionWritingView); 
} 

You should also rename exceptionWritingView to something ending with exception, now it confuses readers who think this is a view.

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As you stated, the biggest problem is that Exceptions provide only getters and this restricts what you are able to do. To solve this, you can inherit from Exception to make its properties settable. In my example class you can initialize FlexibleException which recurrses through a regular exception basically making a copy of it, but a copy that is settable. Then to add a previous exception it can travel down the ladder until it finds the end and tacks on to it, concatenating two exceptions. I've never had to use something like this so this is just something I wrote up and it may have some bugs, but I believe it accomplishes what you are trying to do.

application.Response.Clear();
application.Response.Status = Constants.HttpServerError;
application.Response.TrySkipIisCustomErrors = true;

LogApplicationException(application.Response, exception);
try
{
    WriteViewResponse(exception);
}

catch (Exception exceptionWritingView)
{
    FlexibleException lastException = new FlexibleException(exceptionWritingView);
    lastException.AddPreviousException(exception);
    WriteGracefulResponse(lastException);
}
finally
{
    application.Server.ClearError();
}

public class FlexibleException : Exception
{
    public FlexibleException(Exception e)
    {
        this.InnerException = e.InnerException != null ? new FlexibleException(e.InnerException) : null;
        this.StackTrace = e.StackTrace;
    }

    public FlexibleException InnerException { get; set; }

    public string StackTrace { get; set; }

    public void AddPreviousException(Exception e)
    {
            FlexibleException prevException = new FlexibleException(e);
        FlexibleException nextException = this;

        while (true)
        {
            if (nextException.InnerException != null)
            {
               nextException = nextException.InnerException;
               continue;
            }
            else
            {
               nextException = prevException;
               break;
            }
        }
    }
}

Edit: You cannot add a setter to the InnerException or StackTrace through inheritence, but you can add a separate setter property WritableStackTrace and override StackTrace to return it's value (technically making it settable).

Another alternative to writing a derived Exception class would be to write a function which works very similar to AddPreviousException, except that it will drill down into and exception object, then recreate it passing the exception you want to concatenate to its constructor, then work your way up swallowing each exception.

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This is a really convoluted solution, I feel much better off just using AggregateException than trying to reinvent the wheel.. thanks for the input though! –  Nico Aug 13 '12 at 1:08
    
Oh yeah, I agree if you want simplicity and just want to pass multiple exceptions AggregateException is perfect. One advantage this way would have is that you can maintain the chronological order by having your parent/child exceptions properly nested whereas an AggregateExp is a flat list in which it may be hard to tell which exception occurred first. –  Despertar Aug 13 '12 at 1:18
    
Yeah, I figured that one when I implemented AggregateException, but as long as I add the exceptions in the order they were thrown, I can present them chronologically. –  Nico Aug 13 '12 at 1:27
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