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I would like to add numbers in a dictionary, cumulative so it will add the keys of the dictionary.

x = ' '
dict = {}
list = []
while x != '':
x = raw_input('Enter line:')
p = x.split(' ')
if x != '':
    list.append(p)
result = sum(list, [])
result = result
num = []
for a in result:
for n in dict:
    p = a.count(a)
    l = a
    if n == l:
        l += l
dict[a] = p
print dict

raw_input('')

I would like "dict" to consist of the words from the input and the amount of times that they were entered. Thanks

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

use Counter:

from collections import Counter
x=raw_input('enter line\n')
if x.strip():
    x=x.split()
    count=Counter(x)
    dic=dict(count)
    print dic
else:
    print 'you entered nothing'

output:

>>> 
enter line
cat cat spam eggs foo foo bar bar bar foo
{'eggs': 1, 'foo': 3, 'bar': 3, 'cat': 2, 'spam': 1}

and without using Counter(which is not recommended) you can use sets:

dic= {}
x = raw_input('Enter line:')
if x.strip():
    p = x.split()
    for x in set(p):   #set(p) contains only unique elements of p
        dic[x]=p.count(x)
    print dic
else:
    print 'you entered nothing'

output:

>>> 
Enter line: cat cat spam eggs foo foo bar bar bar foo
{'eggs': 1, 'foo': 3, 'bar': 3, 'cat': 2, 'spam': 1}
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I've tryed all of that, trying to put it into the code and got this: from collections import Counter x = ' ' dict = {} list = [] x = raw_input('Enter Line:') while x != '': p = x.split(' ') if x != '': list.append(p) result = sum(list, []) result = result count = Counter(result) dict[result] = count x = raw_input('Enter line:') –  Angus Moore Aug 12 '12 at 5:43
2  
@AngusMoore don't post code in comments, It's almost unreadable. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Aug 12 '12 at 5:50
    
I wasnt sure where else, to respond to him –  Angus Moore Aug 12 '12 at 5:57
    
@AngusMoore many parts of the code you've posted in question are redundant, I've added the if condition to my answers. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Aug 12 '12 at 5:59
    
@AngusMoore just add the code you posted in comments to the bottom of the question. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Aug 12 '12 at 6:01

Python 2.7 has collections.Counter which can be used to give you a running total of words.

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from collections import Counter

lines = iter(lambda: raw_input('Enter line:'), '') # read until empty line
print Counter(word for line in lines for word in line.split()).most_common()
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