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I'm trying to marry templates to generics with the accent on making access to primitive/value-typed properties as fast as (reasonably) possible, preferrably keeping it in C++/CLR. Consider this simple template:

template< typename type >
class value_wrapper {
public:
    type value;
};

and its counterpart:

generic< typename T >
public ref class ValueWrapper {
    ...
public:
    property T Value {
        T get() {
            if( T::typeid == System::Int32::typeid )
                return ( T )( ( value_wrapper< int > * )ptr )->value;
            ...branches for some other types...
            // if all else fails:
            return ( T )( Object ^ )( ( value_wrapper< gcroot< Object ^ > > * )ptr )->value;
        }
        ...
    }
    ...
private:
    void *ptr;
};

Question 1. When a generic's MSIL is turned into specializations for value types, is the code further optimized? Is it possible to check types here in such a way that, e.g., in ValueWrapper<int> branches for non-int types and type comparisons themselves will be optimized away?

Now, listing all supported types in every single method is somewhat painful, so I have made a separate function for this:

template< typename action, typename context_type >
__forceinline
static bool apply( System::Type ^type, void *value, System::Object ^*box, context_type context ) {
    if( type == System::Int32::typeid )
        return action().operator()< int >( ( int * )value, context ), true;
    ...branches for some other types...
    // if all else fails:
    return action().operator()< gcroot< System::Object ^ > >( box, context ), false;
}

struct get_value {
    template< typename type, typename result_type >
    void operator () ( result_type *result, void *ptr ) {
        *result = ( ( value_wrapper< type > * )ptr )->value;
    }
};

generic< typename T >
public ref class ValueWrapper {
    ...
    property T Value {
        T get() {
            T result;
            System::Object ^box;
            return apply< get_value >( T::typeid, &result, &box, ptr ) ? result : ( T )box;
        }
        ...
    }
    ...
};

Turns out this is about 3x slower than the original code.

Question 2. What can be changed here to allow the optimizer to make the second implementation closer in speed to the first one (ideally, with speed difference within 10%-20%)?

P.S. This is mostly about VC 2010. But if VC 2012 is somehow different in this regard, that would be good to know, too.

share|improve this question
    
You might gain some speed by using a case. Second implementation is slower, and can likely not be made as fast as the first one, because you first construct a T and then assign to it. Moreover you put a System::Object^ on the stack even though it's not needed in all cases, and there might be some overhead of the function calls. –  stijn Aug 12 '12 at 8:41
    
@stijn Do you mean switch( T::typeid )? I don't think it's possible. As for the second question, I'm OK with, say, 10%-20% speed difference, just not 3x. Editing for clarity. (Also: in theory, inlining could help with function call overhead, AND detecting the unnecessity of box & removing it, AND getting rid of extra operations on result. It's all about the optimizer's abilities.) –  vpozdyayev Aug 12 '12 at 9:04
    
oops, sorry indeed switching on typeid does not work –  stijn Aug 12 '12 at 9:59

1 Answer 1

After some tinkering and MSIL-eyeballing, I have an answer to the second question: just pass a typeid getter function instead of typeid itself. It seems to be much easier for the framework to request type information on each comparison, than to store it into some variable (the old type parameter) and reuse it.

With this approach, the slowdown drops from 3x to something like 5-10% (!).

Question 2 out, Question 1 pending.

The resulting code:

template< typename action, typename context_type >
__forceinline
static bool apply( System::Type ^type(), void *value, System::Object ^*box, context_type context ) {
    if( type() == System::Int32::typeid )
        return action().operator()< int >( ( int * )value, context ), true;
    if( type() == SupportedStruct::typeid )
        return action().operator()< SupportedStruct >( ( SupportedStruct * )value, context ), true;
    if( type() == System::String::typeid )
        return action().operator()< std::wstring >( ( System::String ^* )value, context ), true;
    // for both reference types and unknown value types:
    return action().operator()< gcroot< System::Object ^ > >( box, context ), false;
}

struct get_value {
    template< typename type, typename result_type >
    void operator () ( result_type *result, void *ptr ) {
        *result = ( ( value_wrapper< type > * )ptr )->value;
    }
    template< typename type >
    void operator () ( System::String ^*result, void *ptr ) {
        *result = gcnew System::String( ( ( value_wrapper< type > * )ptr )->value.c_str() );
    }
};

generic< typename T >
public ref class ValueWrapper {
    ...
public:
    property T Value {
        T get() {
            T result;
            System::Object ^box;
            return apply< get_value >( TypeGetter, &result, &box, ptr ) ? result : ( T )box;
        }
        ...
    }
    ...
private:
    void *ptr;
private:
    static System::Type ^TypeGetter() {
        return T::typeid;
    }
};
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