Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Running basic java programs from commands line is a 3 steps process:

  1. Write code:

    public class HelloWorld { public static void main(String[] args) { System.out.println("Hello, World"); } }

  2. Compile by javac HellWorld.java which would check for errors & generate HelloWorld.class file.

  3. run code by giving the class name --> java HelloWorld

Now, I am curious to know why:

java HelloWorld works but when we give fullpath of the classfile, it throws an error

$ java HelloWorld.class 
Error: Could not find or load main class HelloWorld.class

What does it make a difference if we give just the classname Vs classname with file-extension?

share|improve this question
    
java looks for the class HelloWorld. when you give HelloWorld.class it looks for the class 'HelloWorld.class" –  Senthil Kumar Aug 12 '12 at 7:48
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

What does it make a difference if we give just the classname Vs classname with file-extension?

The argument you give to the java binary isn't meant to be a filename. It's meant to be a class name. So in particular, if you're trying to start a class called Baz in package foo.bar you would run:

java foo.bar.Baz

So similarly, if you try to run java HelloWorld.class it's as if you're trying to run a class called class in a package HelloWorld, which is incorrect.

Basically, you shouldn't view the argument as a filename - you should view it as a fully-qualified class name. Heck there may not even be a simple Baz.class file on the file system - it may be hidden away within a jar file.

share|improve this answer
2  
OMG! I commented on a question for which Jon Skeet answered! Jon Skeet and I in same page at same time! Pinch me! –  Senthil Kumar Aug 12 '12 at 7:51
add comment

What does it make a difference if we give just the classname Vs classname with file-extension?

It is because that is the way it is. Sun / Oracle have implemented the java command to work that way since Java 1.0, and changing it would be massively disruptive.

As Jon says, the argument to the command is a fully qualified class name, not a filename. In fact, it is quite possible that a file with the name HelloWorld.class does not exist. It could be a member of a JAR file ... or in some circumstances, just about anything.

share|improve this answer
    
that was helpful, Thanks for taking time to answer :) –  Gaurish Sharma Aug 12 '12 at 8:02
add comment

In the Java programming language, source files (.java files) are compiled into (virtual) machine-readable class files which have a .class extension

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.