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I've deployed an app using neo4j java embedded version under Jersey tomcat for REST API. By measuring memory usage with jconsole I noticed each REST call adds 200Mb of memory (which I think it's because the entire graph gets loaded into memory). Therefore with just 5 calls, server allocates 1Gb of memory, which is a lot! To clean up memory I have to wait garbage collector (threshold set to 1Gb).

Is it a normal behavior because I'm using the neo4j java embedded version or am I doing something terribly wrong? What I'm supposed to do to free memory when the API call ends?

Here example code:

@GET
@Produces(MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON + ";charset=utf-8")
public Response getApi( @QueryParam("q")    String query){
try{
// new neo instance here with EmbeddedGraphDatabase
... some code
// stop neo
}catch(Exception ex){
// stop neo
}
return response.ok("json data here").build();   
}

Thanks, Daniele

-------- COMPLETE CLASS CODE ----------

 import javax.ws.rs.GET;
import javax.ws.rs.Path;
import javax.ws.rs.Produces;
import javax.ws.rs.QueryParam;
import javax.ws.rs.core.MediaType;
import javax.ws.rs.core.Response;

import org.neo4j.graphdb.GraphDatabaseService;
import org.neo4j.kernel.EmbeddedGraphDatabase;

@Path("/API")
public class API {

     @GET
     @Produces(MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON)
     public Response apiCall(@QueryParam("q") String query){
        GraphDatabaseService graphDb; 
        try{
            // start neo
            graphDb = new EmbeddedGraphDatabase( "/var/neo4jdb/" );
            this.registerShutdownHook( graphDb );

            // API + NEO code here..

            // stop neo
            graphDb.shutdown();

        }catch(Exception ex){
            // stop neo
            graphDb.shutdown();
        }

        Response response = null;
        return response.ok("This is your query: "+query).build(); 

     }

    /**
     * Server shutdown
     */
    public void registerShutdownHook( final GraphDatabaseService graphDb ){
        // Registers a shutdown hook for the Neo4j instance so that it
        // shuts down nicely when the VM exits (even if you "Ctrl-C" the
        // running example before it's completed)
        Runtime.getRuntime()
                .addShutdownHook( new Thread()
                {
                    @Override
                    public void run()
                    {
                        graphDb.shutdown();
                    }
                } );
    }

}

And then I call the REST service via browser like this http://localhost:8080/API?q=test

UPDATED WITH SINGLETON

     import javax.ws.rs.GET;
    import javax.ws.rs.Path;
    import javax.ws.rs.Produces;
    import javax.ws.rs.QueryParam;
    import javax.ws.rs.core.MediaType;
    import javax.ws.rs.core.Response;

    import org.neo4j.graphdb.GraphDatabaseService;
    import org.neo4j.kernel.EmbeddedGraphDatabase;

    @Path("/API")
    public class API {

         @GET
         @Produces(MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON)
         public Response apiCall(@QueryParam("q") String query){
            GraphDatabaseService graphDb; 
            try{
                // start neo
                Neo4jSingleton neo4jInstance = new Neo4jSingleton();
                GraphDatabaseService graphDb = null;
                graphDb = neo4jInstance.getInstance(DB_PATH);
                this.registerShutdownHook( graphDb );

                // API + NEO code here..
                // cypher query
                        ExecutionEngine engine = new ExecutionEngine(graphDb); 
                        String queryString = "Cypher query code";
                        ExecutionResult result = engine.execute( queryString );
                        // fetch results here..

                // never stop neo now with singleton


            }catch(Exception ex){
                // stop neo
                graphDb.shutdown();
            }

            Response response = null;
            return response.ok("This is your query: "+query).build(); 

         }

        /**
         * Server shutdown
         */
        public void registerShutdownHook( final GraphDatabaseService graphDb ){
            // Registers a shutdown hook for the Neo4j instance so that it
            // shuts down nicely when the VM exits (even if you "Ctrl-C" the
            // running example before it's completed)
            Runtime.getRuntime()
                    .addShutdownHook( new Thread()
                    {
                        @Override
                        public void run()
                        {
                            graphDb.shutdown();
                        }
                    } );
        }

    }
public class Neo4jSingleton {

    private static GraphDatabaseService db;

    public Neo4jSingleton() {

    }

    /*
     * il metodo di restituire un'unica istanza
     * contenente il database neo4j
     */
    public static GraphDatabaseService getInstance(String DB_PATH)
      {

        //Boolean isDbChange=verifyDbChange();

        if (db == null /*|| isDbChange*/)
        {
          db = new EmbeddedGraphDatabase(DB_PATH);
        }

        return db;
      }
}
share|improve this question
    
Best is to use a ServletContextListener to setup the database and execution-engine and shut it down on undeploy. Use static variables and methods to access both. –  Michael Hunger Sep 15 '12 at 21:02
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You must not create Neo4j instance for every request. Please create it just once and then pass it in, either hacky in a static field (as you're resource instance is recreate for each request) or as in Neo4j server with an Provider which is injected with @Context.

Regarding memory usage. Neo4j builds up internal caches according to your usage to serve the same queries faster the next time. So that might amount for some of the used memory.

Btw. how large is your graph and what are the typical operations you do?

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, I'll study how injection works with Jersey. Do you think this approach could be used in production environment with a lot of user requests or there may be other issues and limitations (like the lock store if more than one instance is used)? I'm using the java-embedded version. The db is about 100mb, used for storing some node information and some traversal with cypher. –  Daniele Aug 13 '12 at 13:03
    
Yes, it should be used like this (with @Context injection), esp. in production. –  Michael Hunger Aug 21 '12 at 2:34
    
I've implemented the static singleton solution as you suggested, now the instance gets created only once and it all works smoothly. However I had to take out the shutdown() method. Considering my application, is it wrong? Also, even if everything works OK and I'm using a single neo instance, memory stills ramp up of 300mb for each call. Eventually, what would be the advantage in using @Context versus the static singleton solution implemented? Thanks! –  Daniele Aug 25 '12 at 13:34
    
Can you update your code sample to show the current state? And what are you doing during the request? –  Michael Hunger Sep 5 '12 at 20:02
    
I've updated the code with singleton and sample cypher code. Do you think memory rumps up so high because cypher engine is not singleton too? –  Daniele Sep 12 '12 at 18:55
show 1 more comment

Java won't necessarily reclaim the memory as soon as it is available to be GCed. You might find that you're not seeing significant GC action until you get close to the heap limit. So even if you put your heap limit to 10gb, then you might find memory jumps up again. That isn't necessarily a problem.

However, to solve the issue of neo using N x Memory, you should consider sharing the embedded instance between all your endpoints. Perhaps by moving it to a service class and having a shared instance between the endpoints. If you are using Spring with Jersey then this would be easy to do as you could wire it in by Spring.

share|improve this answer
    
Yup, you're right, if I put the heap limit higher behavior does not change, still need to wait GC to get to 70% of heap to free memory. Concrete problem is most of the time when I reach high memory threshold tomcat and the app stop working as I get a null exception (I suspect there is no more memory to instantiate a new neo instance). I thought the only solution for a production environment was to shift all to neo server version, but you gave me an hope I can keep running with the embedded version.I'm investigating how to share the neo instance but I'm not using Spring, should I switch to it? –  Daniele Aug 12 '12 at 19:47
    
Switching to spring is a bigger topic :) You definitely do not want to be creating a new driver instance each time you access the DB. Post up your NPE if you want feedback on that. –  monkjack Aug 13 '12 at 5:55
    
Thanks, I've updated the post with the full code. –  Daniele Aug 13 '12 at 8:01
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If you're not using Spring or Guice you could get around this by using a static member and static initialization for your neo4J object. If having that static is a deal breaker another option would be to use a static factory to get at a singleton instance of that neo4J object...

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your tips, is there any reference how to use neo in static way or Jersey as singleton? –  Daniele Aug 13 '12 at 8:09
    
If you want the quick and dirty solution - declare GraphDatabaseService as a static member variable and initialize it in a static initialization block. Otherwise initialize your GraphDatabaseService as a singleton. This will allow you to share that instance across your application. You may want to read up on the singleton pattern here (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Singleton_pattern ). DI makes this very easy but if you don't want to add a DI framework you can easily code your own based on those examples from Wikipedia or use Jersey's providers as @MichaelHunger suggests. –  condit Aug 13 '12 at 15:11
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