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I was making a "concatenating iterator", i.e. an iterator that would iterate over the ints in an int**.

Its constructor needs:

  • An array of T**, representing the beginning of each sub-array.
  • An array of T**, representing the end of each sub-array.

Lo and behold, I ran across a situation where goto seemed to be appropriate.

But something within me screamed "NO!!" so I thought I'd come here and ask:

Should I try avoid goto situations like this? (Does it improve the readability if I do?)

#include <algorithm>

template<class T>
class lazy_concat_iterator
{
    // This code was meant to work for any valid input iterator
    // but for easier reading, I'll assume the type is: T**

    mutable T** m_endIt;              // points to an array of end-pointers
    mutable T** m_it;                 // points to an array of begin-pointers
    mutable bool m_started;   // have we started iterating?
    mutable T* m_sub;         // points somewhere in the current sub-array
    mutable T* m_subEnd;      // points to the end of the current sub-array

public:
    lazy_concat_iterator(T** begins, T** ends)
        : m_it(begins), m_endIt(ends), m_started(false) { }

    void ensure_started() const
    {
        if (!m_started)
        {
            m_started = true;

        INIT:
            m_sub = *m_it;
            m_subEnd = *m_endIt;

            if (m_sub == m_subEnd)  // End of this subarray?
            {
                ++m_it;
                ++m_endIt;
                goto INIT;  // try next one         <<< should I use goto here?
            }
        }
    }
};

How you could use it:

#include <vector>
#include <cstring>

using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    vector<char*> beginnings(argv, argv + argc);

    vector<char*> endings;
    for (int i = 0; i < argc; i++)
        endings.push_back(argv[i] + strlen(argv[i]));

    lazy_concat_iterator<char> it(&beginnings[0], &endings[0]);
    it.ensure_started();  // 'it' would call this internally, when dereferenced
}
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6  
Why not use a loop? It is, afterall, exactly what you are implementing with a goto and much easier to read, –  Goz Aug 12 '12 at 9:14
    
@Goz: Well, it would be an unconditional for (;;) { ... } loop, with a break; inside. The lack of a condition makes it seem like a loop would be less readable. But is that actually more readable than a goto? That's my question. –  Mehrdad Aug 12 '12 at 9:15
    
I think so. You'd get a block, and more importantly people don't expect to see a goto in code, so you'll throw them off pace with this. Especially if you just end up implementing a loop anyways. –  Cubic Aug 12 '12 at 9:22
    
I agree, for (;;) { ... if (...) break; ... } is much better. Save goto for implementing FSM's and maybe tail recursion, that's about it's only use. –  jahhaj Aug 12 '12 at 9:28
1  
and you probably don't just want endings to contain the result of strlen, you probably want transform(argv, argv + argc, back_inserter(endings), [](char *arg){return arg + strlen(arg);}); –  bames53 Aug 12 '12 at 9:42
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5 Answers 5

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Yes, you can and should avoid goto, for example this code should do the equivalent for what yours does from the INIT label (this also works for input iterators which was a "hidden requirement" as it doesn't dereference m_it and m_endIt an extra time once the condition is met unlike my previous transformation):

while ((m_subIt = *m_it) == (m_subEnd = *m_endIt))
{
    ++m_it;
    ++m_endIt;
}

Previous answer attempt:

Even a forever loop would be clearer and neater than a goto. It highlights the obvious "never terminate" possibility even better.

    for (;;)
    {
        m_sub = *m_it;
        m_subEnd = *m_endIt;

        if (m_sub != m_subEnd)
            break;

        ++m_it;
        ++m_endIt;
    }

Although I don't see why you need to assign to m_subEnd and m_subIt inside the loop. If you don't you can rewrite this as a while loop:

while (*m_it == *m_endIt)
{
    ++m_it;
    ++m_endIt;
}

m_subIt = *m_it;
m_subEnd = *m_endIt;
share|improve this answer
    
Well, the only way it would "never terminate" is if there's a bug... but it shouldn't happen if the parameters are correct... Or is that what you meant? –  Mehrdad Aug 12 '12 at 9:20
    
Regarding your edit: That doesn't do the same thing, as far as I can tell. You need to have traversed the current sub-array before going to the next sub-array; your edit doesn't make much sense to me. –  Mehrdad Aug 12 '12 at 9:24
    
@Mehrdad: The code seems fragile. What if *m_it matches *m_endIt for the complete range that m_it points to (or the range is empty)? There's no check for running off the end of the range. I don't know what input you are passing it and ensuring that this doesn't happen. –  Charles Bailey Aug 12 '12 at 9:24
    
Do you think that's more readable than the goto? Because it makes me pause a bit before I get what it's doing. (A 'yes' is fine, if it is. I just want to know which one's more readable, since that's why I didn't try going that route.) –  Mehrdad Aug 12 '12 at 9:51
    
@Mehrdad: Yes, I'm totally convinced that it's a lot more readable than the goto solution. If you don't think so, you don't have to use it of course. –  Charles Bailey Aug 12 '12 at 9:54
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while (*m_it == *m_endIt)
{
    ++m_it;
    ++m_endIt;
}

m_sub = *m_it;
m_subEnd = *m_endIt;
share|improve this answer
    
You are aware this doesn't do the same thing, right? –  Mehrdad Aug 12 '12 at 9:22
    
@bames53, thanks. I suspected, I missed smth. –  Lol4t0 Aug 12 '12 at 9:22
1  
@Mehrdad what's different about it? –  bames53 Aug 12 '12 at 9:23
    
@bames53: See my update. It doesn't do the same thing at all, unless I have a bug in my code (which is possible). –  Mehrdad Aug 12 '12 at 9:31
1  
@Mehrdad They still look the same to me. Both loops iterate m_it and m_endIt until they find a non-empty range. –  bames53 Aug 12 '12 at 9:46
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Maybe no for loop, but maybe a do-while?

    do {
        m_sub = *m_it;
        m_subEnd = *m_endIt;

        if (m_sub == m_subEnd)  // End of this subarray?
        {
            ++m_it;
            ++m_endIt;
        }
    } while (m_sub == m_subEnd);

If you don't want to do the comparison twice and still avoid using one of goto's stealth cousins break or continue:

    bool anotherround = FALSE;
    do {
        m_sub = *m_it;
        m_subEnd = *m_endIt;

        anotherround = m_sub == m_subEnd
        if (anotherround)  // End of this subarray?
        {
            ++m_it;
            ++m_endIt;
        }
    } while (anotherround);

With your knowledge of the context I'm sure you can invent better varnames, but that's the idea.

Regarding a goto's influence on readability: for me the main issue with a goto herey is that it forces the programmer to memorize a potential nonlogical movement in the code - all of a sudden the code can jump almost anywhere. If you use control structures, even if you have to introduce some extra lines or whatnot, the program continues to behave as expected and follow the flow. And in the long run, that's what readability is all about.

share|improve this answer
    
That duplicates the code for m_sub == m_subEnd, though. Duplicating code is even more error-prone than using a goto, especially when the condition is complicated... so I don't want to do that. –  Mehrdad Aug 12 '12 at 9:18
    
@Mehrdad I only wanted to show to a perfectly equivalent piece of code could be written without goto or its stealth cousins break, continue & friends. If you do want to get rid of the double condition check you could map it onto a boolean type variable. –  fvu Aug 12 '12 at 9:20
    
Yeah, but then it's even more complicated, which makes me wonder if it's worth doing, in terms of readability. –  Mehrdad Aug 12 '12 at 9:22
    
@Mehrdad admit it, you do love that goto there eh :-) –  fvu Aug 12 '12 at 9:23
    
Sorry, not really up to speed, must have overread that somewhere. I'll remove the comment. –  Cubic Aug 12 '12 at 9:31
show 1 more comment

Don't use a goto. The only case when a goto can be forgiven is if you have a complicated function (which you shouldn't have anyways) and you want to have a centralized exit/cleanup part at the end of the function, where you could goto upon different errors at different parts of the function, or fall through upon success.

All in all, you should use a do-while loop here.

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People created middle and high level compilers with using assembler(and high-level assembler). Assembler has many jmp jnz jg jl commands act like goto. They made it this far. Cant you do the same? If you can't then you answered your own question.

I cant say the same thing for interpreters.

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