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Below there are two scenarios where the operations are seemingly identical but produce results different by 1. I don't think I need to explain the programming, it's very simple.

The variable declarations are first, scenario 1 is 1) and 2 = 2), and the results obtained are listed last in each scenario.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

int intWorkingNumber = 176555;

int intHundreds = 1;

int intPower = 1;

1)

int intDeductionValue = (intHundreds * 100 * pow(1000, intPower));

intWorkingNumber -= intDeductionValue;  

intWorkingNumber = 76555

2)

intWorkingNumber -= (intHundreds * 100 * pow(1000, intPower))

intWorkingNumber = 76554
share|improve this question
    
'double pow( double base, double exp );' - FP not integer arithmetic, so results like yours are just expected. – Martin James Aug 12 '12 at 10:13
    
Thanks to J Steen for editing my question- indentation formatting for code is noted. – Beginner Aug 12 '12 at 10:31
    
@Mark Note the question mark at the end- the sentence was implied to mean "Are these two simple identical integer calculations?". Nonetheless, thanks for the help. – Beginner Aug 12 '12 at 10:38
up vote 17 down vote accepted

The difference between the two code samples is when you cast to int.

The first version is similar to this code, where you cast to integer before you subtract:

intWorkingNumber = 176555 - (int)(1 * 100 * pow(1000, 1));

The second version is similar to this, where you cast to integer after you subtract:

intWorkingNumber = (int)(176555 - (1 * 100 * pow(1000, 1)));

The function pow returns a floating point number. If the result of 1 * 100 * pow(1000, 1) is not exactly equal to 100000.0000 (and with floating point operations, you should not normally rely on exact results) these two are not equivalent.

Consider this simpler example:

x = 10 - (int)0.001;   // x = 10 - 0;     => x = 10
y = (int)(10 - 0.001); // y = (int)9.999; => y = 9
share|improve this answer
3  
Must mention that pow returns a float for this to make sense. – Puppy Aug 12 '12 at 10:12
    
@DeadMG: Mentioned. Thanks for the comment. – Mark Byers Aug 12 '12 at 10:20
    
@Mark Thanks for the answer. – Beginner Aug 12 '12 at 10:36

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