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EDIT 2

Find more info about this problem in my other SO question.

EDIT 1

I have refreshed this post and so therefore the content may be incongruent with the comments made by Alexey, Hicham, Jonathan and Mat.

The below code uses this FFT to assist in onset detection. When the method is called once, everything works fine and I get a nice log of values. When the method is called a second time I get nan or junk. Any ideas?

{
    NSLog(@"Running onset.");
    NSMutableArray *mutableArrayOfFlags = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
    OnsetsDS  *ods = malloc(sizeof *ods); 
    float* odsdata = (float*) malloc(onsetsds_memneeded(ODS_ODF_RCOMPLEX, 512, 11));
    onsetsds_init(ods, odsdata, ODS_FFT_FFTW3_HC, ODS_ODF_RCOMPLEX, 512, 11, 44100);
    int i;
    int x;
    bool onset; 

    for (i = 0; i < vocalBuffer.numFrames; i=i+512){

        // convert vocal int to double 
        double (*vocalData)[2] =  malloc(2 * 512 * sizeof(double));
        for (x = 0; x < 512; x++){
            *vocalData[x] = (double)vocalBuffer.buffer[i+x]; 
        }

        // init malloc output double 
        double (*outPutDoubleFFTData)[2];
        outPutDoubleFFTData =  malloc(2 * 512 * sizeof(double)); 
        fft(512, vocalData, outPutDoubleFFTData);



        int z;
        // init malloc float fft data
        float *floatFFTData; 
        floatFFTData = malloc(512 * sizeof(float));
        for (z = 0; z < 512; z++){
            floatFFTData[z] = (float)*outPutDoubleFFTData[z];
            if (i==512*20) {
                // NSLog(@"PRE POST %f - %f",*vocalData[z], floatFFTData[z]);
                NSLog(@"PRE POST FLOAT %f - %f - %f",*vocalData[z], (*outPutDoubleFFTData)[z], floatFFTData[z]);

            }
        }

        onset = onsetsds_process(ods, floatFFTData);

        free((*outPutDoubleFFTData));
        free(floatFFTData);
        free(vocalData);

        if (onset){
            printf("onset --> %i\n", i);
            NSNumber *integer = [[NSNumber alloc] initWithInt:i];
            [mutableArrayOfFlags addObject:integer];
        }
    }


    free(ods->data); // Or free(odsdata), they point to the same thing in this case
    free(ods);
    return [[NSArray alloc] initWithArray:mutableArrayOfFlags];    
}

Log from first time method is called:

2012-10-20 11:22:19.625 XX[4125:1903] PRE POST FLOAT 4.000000 - 7979.000000 - 7979.000000
2012-10-20 11:22:19.628 XX[4125:1903] PRE POST FLOAT 25.000000 - 0.000000 - 861.794861
2012-10-20 11:22:19.635 XX[4125:1903] PRE POST FLOAT 32.000000 - 861.794875 - 248.516144
2012-10-20 11:22:19.640 XX[4125:1903] PRE POST FLOAT 22.000000 - 92.284860 - -190.525833
2012-10-20 11:22:19.645 XX[4125:1903] PRE POST FLOAT 23.000000 - 248.516141 - 37.045593
2012-10-20 11:22:19.648 XX[4125:1903] PRE POST FLOAT 30.000000 - -33.565115 - 7.444437

Log from second time message is called.

2012-10-20 11:22:36.353 XX[4125:3e07] PRE POST FLOAT 4.000000 - 7979.000000 - 7979.000000
2012-10-20 11:22:36.358 XX[4125:3e07] PRE POST FLOAT 25.000000 - 53979063281237364484736793729327605401034441222848177467876829146104162439787488863720409331484927794377967278456986000075570355992521879340404128702782598833969629491268820332191001022225312452183861587484411698307560976546539765760.000000 - inf
2012-10-20 11:22:36.364 XX[4125:3e07] PRE POST FLOAT 32.000000 - 
share|improve this question
3  
If you don't initialize what you allocated, you can't count on anything. If your code doesn't work with NaNs, maybe you have other issues too. –  Mat Aug 12 '12 at 15:27
    
So something like double (*doubleFFTData)[2]; and then ` doubleFFTData = malloc(2 * 512 * sizeof(double));`? –  Eric Brotto Aug 12 '12 at 15:31
    
malloc returns a chunk of bytes that can contain absolutely anything. You need to initialize those. (I don't understand the code you posted, it's not clear at all what you think you're doing with it, but you're not initializing the contents of the array you allocated.) –  Mat Aug 12 '12 at 15:33
    
Why is the malloc() using 512 * 2 and the test on i using 512 * 20? It may not matter at all; it might be a trivial typo. –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 12 '12 at 15:50
    
The test is just because I want to look at values without having to print out the whole buffer which is huge. The 512 * 2 not really sure about :(. –  Eric Brotto Aug 12 '12 at 15:53

7 Answers 7

 OnsetsDS  *ods = malloc(sizeof *ods); 

This code is a little weird to me. This might be better.

 OnsetsDS  *ods = malloc(sizeof OnsetsDS); 

I know if you did this in C or C++, *ods could be doing one of many things, all depending on your compiler. It might not be initialized yet, pointing to NULL, pointing to a random memory address with junk data, or even something else.

You can also do something like

 OnsetsDS ods;

and just pass &ods with your variables in many cases, at least in C++. I'm still in the process of learning objective-C I'll admit.

share|improve this answer

Try using calloc(1, size) instead of malloc(size)

share|improve this answer
    
That will just hide the error - better to have a crash from being uninitialised and work out why the array is not being initialised from the data. –  kallikak Oct 28 '12 at 3:45

you are mixing pointers: *doubleFFTData[b] and double (*doubleFFTData)[2] dont match.

if you want two arrays of 512 doubles :

int b; double (*doubleFFTData)[2]; 
doubleFFTData[0] =  calloc(1 , 2 * 512 * sizeof(double)); // initialize the array to 0       
doubleFFTData[1] = doubleFFTData[0] + 512;  

for (b = 0; b < 512;b++){    
    NSLog(@"results: %f", doubleFFTData[0][b]);
} 
/*and : */

for (b = 0; b < 512;b++){ 
    NSLog(@"results: %f", doubleFFTData[1][b]); 
}
share|improve this answer
    
doubleFFTData[b][0] (which is equivalent to *doubleFFTData[b]) and doubleFFTData[b][1] in the original code would choose individual doubles in the b-th pair of doubles. That's not the problem. The problem with "random" values is in the uninitialized memory acquired from malloc(). –  Alexey Frunze Aug 12 '12 at 16:42

double (*doubleFFTData)[2] defines doubleFFTData as a pointer to an array of 2 doubles.

*doubleFFTData[b] is evaluated as first evaluating [b] and then evaluating *.

Since doubleFFTData as a pointer to an array of 2 doubles, doubleFFTData[b] is b-th array of 2 doubles.

That b-th array of 2 doubles, doubleFFTData[b], decays to a pointer, the pointer to 0-th element of the array of 2 doubles. When you dereference this pointer with * you get the first double of the two.

So, *doubleFFTData[b] is equivalent to doubleFFTData[b][0], it gets the first double in the pair of doubles representing a complex-valued DFT point.

That part seems to be fine.

But you aren't initalizing the memory allocated with malloc(). malloc() does not set the allocated memory to any predetermined value as it's not required by the C language standard. So, that memory can contain whatever data is left over from previously executed code or it can be just pure garbage if the memory hasn't yet been used after the PC was powered on.

You don't want to use uninitialized variables. Unless, you're implementing a pseudo-random number generator for SSL or such.

share|improve this answer
    
you answer is wrong : Since doubleFFTData as a pointer to an array of 2 doubles, doubleFFTData[b] is b-th array of 2 doubles : doubleFFTData is an array of two pointers (to double). so *doubleFFTData[b] is evaluated first as b-th pointer of double : unfornatly, this is called buffer overflow ! the evaluation deferencing of double* has no sense. there is no b pointers allocated(if b > 2). there is only 1 or two pointers so the code is a non sens. it sin=mply show the need to learn more about pointers ad.or the simplify the coding. –  Hicham from CppDepend Team Aug 12 '12 at 17:36
    
@HichamfromCppDependTeam Pointer-wise there isn't much difference between this case and char* p = malloc(100); p[99] = somevalue; printf("%c\n", p[99]);. The difference is just the object being pointed to by the pointer, char vs array of 2 doubles. But in both cases there's enough memory allocated so the pointer dereference is valid (if we ignore the unitialized state of the buffer in the code in the question). –  Alexey Frunze Aug 12 '12 at 17:52
/// my comments are with ///

- (void)objcMallocEx
{
    NSLog(@"Running onset.");
    // an obj-c allocation
    NSMutableArray *mutableArrayOfFlags = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];

/// i would prefer to see this, followed by &ods in the call below, and get rid of the free at the bottom
/// OnsetsDS  *ods = malloc(sizeof *ods); 
    OnsetsDS    ods = NULL;

/// Q: is onsetsds_init() expecting odsdata as a buffer it can fill?
///   or is it expecting you to be providing it with the address to a pointer that it will fill?
///   if the former, then you've done the right thing below.  if the latter, then
///    what you really need is
///     float* odsdata = NULL;
///   and then pass the &odsdata as the 2nd arg to onsetsds_init() on the next line.
    float* odsdata = (float*) malloc(onsetsds_memneeded(ODS_ODF_RCOMPLEX, 512, 11));

/// onsetsds_init(ods, odsdata, ODS_FFT_FFTW3_HC, ODS_ODF_RCOMPLEX, 512, 11, 44100);
    onsetsds_init(&ods, odsdata, ODS_FFT_FFTW3_HC, ODS_ODF_RCOMPLEX, 512, 11, 44100);

    int i;
    int x;
    bool onset; 

    for (i = 0; i < vocalBuffer.numFrames; i=i+512){

/// in the assignment for the loop, you are declaring that you want an array
/// of 2 double* .  but the malloc assignment is more like a single array
/// of 1024 double items.  it seems like what you really want is 2 arrays of
/// 512 double items.
///     // convert vocal int to double 
///     double (*vocalData)[2] =  malloc(2 * 512 * sizeof(double));
        double vocalData[2][512];

/// if you absolutely insist on using allocation for this, the closest
/// semantically declaration would be
///     double* vocalData[2] = { malloc(512) * sizeof(double)), malloc(512) * sizeof(double) }
/// or
///     double* vocalData[] = (double*)malloc(2 * sizeof(double*));
///     vocalData[0] = malloc(512) * sizeof(double);
///     vocalData[1] = malloc(512) * sizeof(double);

/// THE FOLLOWING IS PART I OF WHAT'S LEADING TO THE DISPLAY OF "RANDOM" DATA
///
/// now, according to your original declaration, you have an array of two pointer-to-double,
/// but in the loop below, c++ operator precedence means it will operate on [x] first, and then on
/// * .  so ... you are getting what's at the xth pointer-to-double, and then getting the value of
/// of that.  if x is 100, and sizeof(double)==8 and sizeof(pointer-to-double)==4, then you the
/// code below is acting as though it wants to get what's at the memory 400 bytes from vocalData,
/// but if you want the 100th double, you should be getting what's at the memory 800 bytes from
/// vocalData.
///     for (x = 0; x < 512; x++){
///         *vocalData[x] = (double)vocalBuffer.buffer[i+x]; 
///     }
        for (x = 0; x < 512; x++)
            vocalData[0][x] = (double)vocalBuffer.buffer[i+x];
/// or      (*vocalData)[x] = (double)vocalBuffer.buffer[i+x];

/// if you absolutely insist on using pointer arithmetic for this, the closest 
/// semantically correct code would be
///     for (x = 0; x < 512; x++)
///         *(vocalData+(sizeof(double)*x)) = (double)vocalBuffer.buffer[i+x];

/// again, with outPutDoubleFFTData, you are declaring that you want an array
/// of 2 double*, but the malloc assignment is more like a single array of
/// 1024 double items.
/// some of what is correct depends upon what the arg signature of fft() is ...

        // init malloc output double 
///     double (*outPutDoubleFFTData)[2];
///     outPutDoubleFFTData =  malloc(2 * 512 * sizeof(double)); 

        double outPutDoubleFFTData[2][512];

/// if you absolutely insist on using allocation for this, the closest
/// semantically equivalent declaration would be
///     double* outPutDoubleFFTData[2] = { malloc(512) * sizeof(double), malloc(512) * sizeof(double) }
/// or
///     double* outPutDoubleFFTData[] = (double*)malloc(2 * sizeof(double*));
///     outPutDoubleFFTData[0] = malloc(512) * sizeof(double);
///     outPutDoubleFFTData[1] = malloc(512) * sizeof(double);

        fft(512, vocalData, outPutDoubleFFTData);

        int z;
        // init malloc float fft data
        float *floatFFTData; 
        floatFFTData = malloc(512 * sizeof(float));
        for (z = 0; z < 512; z++){

/// THE FOLLOWING IS PART II OF WHAT'S LEADING TO THE DISPLAY OF "RANDOM" DATA
/// and, again, according to the original declaration, below, if z == 100 and
/// sizeof(double)==8 and sizeof(double*)==4, then you'll be accessing the memory
/// at the location 400 away from outPutDoubleFFTData when what you really want is
/// the memory that's 800 away from outPutDoubleFFTData.
///
///         floatFFTData[z] = (float)*outPutDoubleFFTData[z];
///
            floatFFTData[z] = (float)((*outPutDoubleFFTData)[z]);

            if (i==512*20) {
                // NSLog(@"PRE POST %f - %f",*vocalData[z], floatFFTData[z]);
/// here, you got the pointer arithmetic into outPutDoubleFFTData correct !!
/// the trouble is, what you stored there is unknown because of the calculations above !!!
                NSLog(@"PRE POST FLOAT %f - %f - %f",*vocalData[z], (*outPutDoubleFFTData)[z], floatFFTData[z]);

            }
        }

        onset = onsetsds_process(ods, floatFFTData);

/// the following isn't going to free what you allocated
///     free((*outPutDoubleFFTData));
/// to do that, you should have
///     free(outPutDoubleFFTData);
/// but best of all is to use the 2-d array in the stack, and then you won't need the heep 

        free(floatFFTData);
/// also don't need the following if using the simple array declaration instead
///     free(vocalData);

        if (onset){
            printf("onset --> %i\n", i);
            NSNumber *integer = [[NSNumber alloc] initWithInt:i];
            [mutableArrayOfFlags addObject:integer];
        }
    }

/// here, since you did a malloc into odsdata, the best thing to do would be to free
/// the same variable as well.
    free(ods->data); // Or free(odsdata), they point to the same thing in this case


/// this isn't necessary if you use the code i've replaced above, rather than what
/// you had that is now commented out.
///  free(ods);

    return [[NSArray alloc] initWithArray:mutableArrayOfFlags];    
}
share|improve this answer

I think it is much easier and safer to use explicit 2D array notation to access and manipulate your data as is done in the fft code example you refer to. Declaring as double (*x)[2] and then allocating as a single chunk using x = malloc(2 * N * sizeof(double)) is designed to make this possible while keeping the data optimally localised for numerical work.

Try clearing up your array references in this way and you should be able to track down the uninitialised memory problem that you are seeing.

Also, the line free((*outPutDoubleFFTData)) shows some confusion about just what was allocated.

share|improve this answer
float *floatFFTData; 
 floatFFTData = malloc(512 * sizeof(float));
 for (z = 0; z < 512; z++){
   floatFFTData[z] = (float)*outPutDoubleFFTData[z];
   if (i==512*20) {
     // NSLog(@"PRE POST %f - %f",*vocalData[z], floatFFTData[z]);
     NSLog(@"PRE POST FLOAT %f - %f - %f",*vocalData[z], (*outPutDoubleFFTData)[z], floatFFTData[z]);
   }
 }

Well you allocated memory for 512 floats, but trying to itarate about 513 floats, 0 till 512 are 513, so you run into an segfault

share|improve this answer
    
z < 512 so the loop will iterate 0 -> 511 –  Peter Warbo Oct 25 '12 at 7:46

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