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I'm using the following function named isExpression to determine whether some JavaScript code is an expression:

function isExpression(code) {
    try {
        new Function("return " + code);
        return true;
    } catch (e) {
        return false;
    }
}

It works correctly for all test cases except one - it incorrectly treats a FunctionDeclaration as a FunctionExpression and returns true instead of false. Is there some way to fix this problem without having to write a parser?

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How about new Function(code + " + 0"); ? Oh wait; new Function(code.replace(/\n/g, ' ') + " + 0"); ... no that won't work either. Probably you have to write a parser :-) –  Pointy Aug 12 '12 at 14:18
3  
I don't think you can. A function declaration is a valid expression in an expression context. So if you just evaluate code in an expression context, there is no way to tell the difference. –  Felix Kling Aug 12 '12 at 14:21
    
@Pointy - It wouldn't make any difference. It would still treat a FunctionDeclaration as a FunctionExpression. –  Aadit M Shah Aug 12 '12 at 14:22
    
@FelixKling - I know. The question is do I need to write a full fledged parser to determine if it's a function declaration. –  Aadit M Shah Aug 12 '12 at 14:25
1  
Mmmh... let me think again. You want to take a piece of code and test whether it possibly could be an expression? Code starting with function could still be a function expression, either named or anonymous. Only by the context you can distinguish a named function expression from a function declaration. But it seems you don't have any context, so there would be no way to tell. Sorry, got a bit lost in between. –  Felix Kling Aug 12 '12 at 14:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

As @FelixKling pointed out the only way to determine if a function is a declaration and not an expression is to check the context of the function. However in a REPL (for which the isExpression function is intended) there is no context. Thus matters become simpler.

The code typed into a REPL can only be a function declaration if it starts with the keyword function (after trimming whitespace in the beginning). Hence it can be tested by the regular expression /^\s*function\s/.

@FelixKling points out that such a function may still be an expression and not a declaration depending upon the context of the function (i.e. the function is an expression if it's a non-source element). However the code passed to this function is guaranteed to be a source element.

If such a function construct were to be used as an expression using the conditional operator (e.g. function f() {} ? x : y) or using the comma operator (e.g. function f() {}, x) then isExpression would still return false. However such code would raise a SyntaxError. Hence the following implementation of isExpression will correctly test whether some code is an expression for all cases:

var isExpression = function (functionDeclaration) {
    return function (code) {
        if (functionDeclaration.test(code)) return false;

        try {
            Function("return " + code);
            return true;
        } catch (error) {
            return false;
        }
    };
}(new RegExp(/^\s*function\s/));
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By checking the type of the value returned by your constructed function we can determine that the original expression was a function.

function isExpression(code) {
    try {
        return typeof (new Function("return " + code)) () !== 'function';
    } catch (e) {
        return false;
    }
}

Caveat : calls in the string will be invoked. This may make this less useful.

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But the object is to determine if it is a function expression or a function declaration. –  Quentin Aug 12 '12 at 14:40
    
This would be wrong in case code was genuinely a function expression (e.g. (function () {})). –  Aadit M Shah Aug 12 '12 at 14:41
1  
See jsfiddle.net/7HVkK - you get the same result. As comments on the question pointed out, the difference between a function expression and a function declaration is the context in which the code appears. Sticking return in front of it (as your code does) turns it into a function expression. –  Quentin Aug 12 '12 at 18:03

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