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So I created a sand simulation with javascript and canvas.

My first approach was an array filled with objects with an x and y value. Each object represented a grain of sand.

This method worked on a large canvas, but began to slow down after ~600 grains.

My next approach was a two dimensional matrix, where each index is either 0 or 1. It works fine on a 200 x 200 canvas, but as the canvas size increases it gets way too slow.

..which is reasonable, since a 800 x 600 canvas for example has a length of 480k.

So my question is, how does one optimize such a thing ?

Here is some code if you need it:

var draw = function() {

    if (MOUSE_DOWN) { cast_grains(); }

    for (var i = matrix.length; i > 0; i--) {
        if (matrix[i] == "1") {

            var x = i % canvas.width;
            var y = Math.floor(i / canvas.width);

            bfr.fillStyle = "#000";
            bfr.fillRect(x, y, 1, 1);

            /* ... movement calculation ... */

            bfr.fillStyle = "rgb(255, 255, 200)";
            bfr.fillRect(x, y, 1, 1);
        }
    }

    ctx.drawImage(buffer, 0, 0);
};
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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

First I would use Chrome's Developer Tools to profile your app and find out what is exactly your bottleneck.

In case the collision detection algorithm is slowing down fix with increasing number of objects, you can implement a Quad Tree to reduce the numbers of comparisons. See here for a javascript implementation.

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Yeah I read that on wikipedia recently. Thanks for the link! –  user625860 Aug 14 '12 at 18:02

You basically need to use a different data structure. I created something similar (an MMO version of Conway's Game of Life) which uses a board of size 2 ^ 106 (which is nearly 80 quadrillion quadrillion cells if I'm not mistaken).

The trick is to only store the coordinates of live cells (in the form of vectors). Since the number of live cells is far lesser than the number of dead cells you end up using very little space.

You also have the advantage of not needing to calculate x and y in your loop since your storing your grains of sand as coordinate vectors. Your function would look something like:

var draw = function() {

    if (MOUSE_DOWN) { cast_grains(); }

    for (var i = grains.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
        var x = grains[i][0];
        var y = grains[i][1];

        bfr.fillStyle = "#000";
        bfr.fillRect(x, y, 1, 1);

        /* ... movement calculation ... */

        bfr.fillStyle = "rgb(255, 255, 200)";
        bfr.fillRect(x, y, 1, 1);
    }

    ctx.drawImage(buffer, 0, 0);
};
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