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I'm struggling to get my head round django forms.. I've been reading various documentation but just can't quite grasp the concepts. I have got to grips with models, views and templates. What I am trying to do is to create a form with various fields composing of dropdown lists and checkboxes which are populated by values in a database.

I have a working app called vms. Using the models.py I have a built a simple schema that holds size and type. Size consists of 'small', 'medium' & 'large'. Type is 'windows' & 'linux'. Using the admin site, I can add an extra size, for example 'Extra Large'.

What I would like to do is create a form that has a drop down list of the vm sizes. If an extra size gets added via the admin site, I would like that size to appear in the drop down list.

I would submit my attempts at the code, but actually am struggling with the concepts. Can anyone help guide me in how to accomplish the above?

Thanks Oli

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2  
    
I've seen both of these articles and I'll reread that again.. I was hoping to understand the relationships between forms, views and templates and how to create a drop down list.. I suppose maybe it 'll just take me time to digest.. if anyone else can spare some time explaining this, I would be very happy! –  Oli Aug 12 '12 at 16:27
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2 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Forms are just a tool to simplify and speed-up (the development of) the process of fetching POST data from request. A manual way would be to do request.POST.get('somefield') for all the fields there could be in a html form. Django can do better that that.

In its essence, a Form class holds a number of Fields and performs these tasks:

  1. display html inputs,
  2. collect and validate data when user submits,
  3. if fields don't validate, return the values along with error messages to html,
  4. if all fields validate, provide form.cleaned_data dictionary as a convenient way to access these values in view.

With these values, I could then manually crate a new instance of a MyModel and save it. Of course, I would have to define a Field in the Form for every Field in MyModel model.

This means that, basically, I could do something like this:
(forgive me for not testing this code, so I can't vouch that is's 100% correct)

models.py:

    class MyModel(models.Model):
        field1 = models.CharField(max_length=40, blank=False, null=False)
        field2 = models.CharField(max_length=60, blank=True, null=True)

forms.py:

    class MyModelForm(forms.Form):
        form_field1 = forms.CharField(max_length=40, required=True)
        form_field2 = forms.CharField(max_length=60, required=False)

views.py:

    def create_a_my_model(request):
        if request.method == 'POST':
            form = MyModelForm(request.POST)
            if form.is_valid():
                my_model = MyModel()
                my_model.field1 = form.cleaned_data.get('form_field1', 'default1')
                my_model.field2 = form.cleaned_data.get('form_field2', 'default2')
                my_model.save()
        else:        
            form = MyModelForm()
        c = { 'form' : form }
        return HttpResponse('templtate.html', c)

(this could be written with a few lines of code less, but it's meant to be as clear as possible)

Notice there are no relation between model Fields and form Fields! We have to manually assign values to MyModel instance when creating it.

The above example outlines generic form workflow. It is often needed in complex situations, but not in such a simple one as is this example.

For this example (and a LOT of real-world examples), Django can do better that that!

You can notice two annoying issues in the above example:

  1. I have to define model Fields and Form fields each, and they are very similar, so that's kinda duplicate work (the similarity grows when adding labels, validators etc.),
  2. creating of MyModel instance is a bit silly, having to assign all those values manually.

This is where ModelForms come in.

These act basically just like a regular form (actually, they are extended from regular forms), but they can save me some of the work (the two issues I just outlined, of course :) ).

So back to the two issues:

  1. Instead of defining a form Field for each model Field, I simply define model = MyModel in the the Meta class. This instructs the Form to automatically generate form Fields from model Fields.

  2. Model forms have save method available. This can be used to create instance of model in one line in the view, instead of manually assigning field-by-field.

So, lets make the example above with a ModelForm:

models.py:

    class MyModel(models.Model):
        field1 = models.CharField(max_length=40, blank=False, null=False)
        field2 = models.CharField(max_length=60, blank=True, null=True)

forms.py:

    class MyModelForm(forms.ModelForm):
        class Meta:
            model = MyModel

views.py:

    def create_a_my_model(request):
        if request.method == 'POST':
            form = MyModelForm(request.POST)
            if form.is_valid():
                # save the model to database, directly from the form:
                my_model = form.save()  # reference to my_model is often not needed at all, a simple form.save() is ok
                # alternatively:
                # my_model = form.save(commit=False)  # create model, but don't save to database
                # my.model.something = whatever  # if I need to do something before saving it
                # my.model.save()
        else:        
            form = MyModelForm()
        c = { 'form' : form }
        return HttpResponse('templtate.html', c)

Hope this clears up the usage of Django forms a bit.

Just one more note - it is perfectly ok to define form Fields on a ModelForm. These will not be used in form.save() but can still be access with form.cleaned_data just as in a regular Form.

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Hi - thanks for your post. I'm going to give this a go right now and I'll come back to you with progress - in fact I noticed that your post is similar to some of the documentation I have read, but you've included some clear examples.. This will definitely help put it all together.. Hopefully will get there soon.. –  Oli Aug 12 '12 at 19:06
1  
Hey - have my forms working now.. Over the first hurdle - thanks for your help. Together with the examples give in this question, docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/intro/tutorial04/?from=olddocs and docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/topics/forms/?from=olddocs and this site, peachybits.com/2011/09/django-1-3-form-api-modelform-example I was able to work it out. –  Oli Aug 13 '12 at 14:42
1  
Very well written for newcomers –  buffer Feb 4 at 11:32
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Have you tried working with ModelForms before? As I understand, you're looking to create a form based on the model you created right?

Lets say your model is called Temp. You can create a form that correlates with this model (and your question) like this:

forms.py

from django.forms import ModelForm

class TempForm(ModelForm):
  class Meta:
    model = Temp

The ModelForm will automatically map the selections/choices from your model to a form version.

If you plan on using this in a template later, doing something like this will automatically create a drop-down menu with choices:

<form>
  <label for="id_size">Size</label>
  {{ form.size }}
</form>

Hope that answers your question!

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Thanks for your answer.. I will try and give this a go. I actually came across this site, peachybits.com/2011/09/django-1-3-form-api-modelform-example, even though it's django 1.3 I can see the concepts that are used. I'll come back to you when I've understood your example. Just getting over the initial hurdle seems hard, but once I've got it, I'm sure it'll flow easily. –  Oli Aug 12 '12 at 19:03
    
Hey - have my forms working now.. Over the first hurdle - thanks for your help. Together with the examples give in this question, docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/intro/tutorial04/?from=olddocs and docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/topics/forms/?from=olddocs and this site, peachybits.com/2011/09/django-1-3-form-api-modelform-example I was able to work it out. –  Oli Aug 13 '12 at 14:42
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