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I am trying to set up quick sort, and I want it to sort an array of fractions.
Currently, it won't properly sort fractions that have an equal value (e.g. 1/2 and 2/4)
1/2 would need to be before 2/4, yet it ends up completly random.

The code I'm using is this:

   public static void quicksort(Fraction[] f, int p, int r)
    {
        if (p < r)
        {
            int q = partition(f, p, r);
            quicksort(f, p, q - 1);
            quicksort(f, q + 1, r);
        }
    }

    public static int partition(Fraction[] f, int p, int r)
    {
        Fraction pivot = f[r];
        int i = p - 1;
        for (int j = p; j < r; j++)
        {
            if (f[j].Value < pivot.Value)
            {
                i++;
                Fraction wissel = f[i];
                f[i] = f[j];
                f[j] = wissel;
            }
            else
                if (f[j].Value < pivot.Value && f[j].Teller < pivot.Teller)
                {
                    i++;
                    Fraction wissel = f[i];
                    f[i] = f[j];
                    f[j] = wissel;
                }
        }
        Fraction wisselt = f[i + 1];
        f[i + 1] = f[r];
        f[r] = wisselt;
        return i + 1;

    }

Can anyone shed some light on how to do this?

EDIT: David Archer's suggestion fixed it, thank you guys.

share|improve this question
3  
What is Fraction ? –  L.B Aug 12 '12 at 15:48
    
Fraction is a class with 3 properties, the upper part of the fraction, the lower part, and the value when those two parts are divided. Teller, Noemer and Value, respectetly. –  LordofTurtles Aug 12 '12 at 16:21
    
FYI, the English translation of the Dutch Teller and Noemer is Numerator and Denominator, respectively. –  Jon Hanna Aug 12 '12 at 16:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I'm not sure what Fraction class you are using but if you need to distinguish between 1/2 and 2/4 (which are equal in strict mathematical terms), I'd suggest creating your own comparison methods and using those instead of the built-in greater-than and less-than operators.

bool IsLessThan(Fraction a, Fraction b)
{
    // Your code here that results in 1/2 being less than 2/4
}

bool IsGreaterThan(Fraction a, Fraction b)
{
    // Your code here that results in 2/4 being greater than 1/2
}
share|improve this answer
    
Then all code that compares a half with two quarters would say that the former was less than the latter, which is wrong in just about every context barring this exception. –  Jon Hanna Aug 12 '12 at 15:54
    
Doh! You're right. Instead of overloading, it would probably be better to keep this logic localized to the quicksort. Answer updated. –  David Archer Aug 12 '12 at 15:59
    
This would actually totally solve the issue, if I can do it right. The program is limited to just performing a quick sort or an insertion sort based on the number of instancs in the array, so it would not be clutter code irrelevant for the rest of the program, unless there is some bigger objection you two came upon that I can't understand. –  LordofTurtles Aug 12 '12 at 16:08
    
If the program is just doing this sorting, then there's no issue going either way. If you're doing other things with the Fractions where you want 1/2 to equal 2/4 and just want this ordering for sorting, it's better to keep the logic localized. –  David Archer Aug 12 '12 at 16:16
    
That users may want a strange ordering like this is one of the two reasons the framework's Sort takes the approach it does. (The other is the overlapping case that people may want to sort things that don't have a built-in order). Copy the framework's approach. –  Jon Hanna Aug 12 '12 at 16:18

Your problem is that you're designing your quicksort to depend upon < for comparison.

You could solve it immediately by re-defining < to have 1/2 as less than 2/4, but then that would mess up every other case where < was used as a fraction.

You should define your sort the normal .NET way, where you have a form taking a System.Comparison delegate, a form taking a System.IComparer and overloads that don't use them, implemented by these.

internal class DelegateComparer<T> : IComparer<T>
{
  private Comparison _del;
  public DelegateComparer(Comparison del)
  {
    _del = del;
  }
  public int Compare(T x, T y)
  {
    return _del(x, y);
  }
}
public static void Quicksort(Fraction[] f, int p, int r, IComparer<Fraction> cmp)
{
  /* This is the only method with the real implementation */
}
public static void Quicksort(Fraction[] f, int p, int r)
{
  QuickSort(f, p, r, Comparer<Fraction>.Default);
}
public static void Quicksort(Fraction[] f, int p, int r, Comparison<Fraction> cmp)
{
  QuickSort(f, p, r, new DelegateComparer(cmp));
}
public static void QuickSort(Fraction[] f)
{
  QuickSort(f, 0, f.Length, Comparer<Fraction>.Default);
}

This done, all you need to do for your strange case of putting 1/2 before 2/4 is a custom comparer that does this. Let's assume your Fraction class is something like:

public class Fraction
{
  public int Denominator{get;set;}
  public int Numerator{get;set;}
  public double Value
  {
    return (double) Numerator / (double) Denominator;
  }
}

Then you can quickly write an IComparer<Fraction> or a Comparison<Fraction> that does the trick. Lets take the second option:

private static int CompareSepDenom(Fraction x, Fraction y)
{
  int cmp = x.Value.CompareTo(y.Value);//normal comparison first
  if(cmp == 0)//same value;
    return x.Numerator.CompareTo(y.Numerator);//put lower numerator (also lower denum) first
  return cmp;
}

If this is real code, rather than experimenting, then we also wouldn't bother implementing quick-sort, since Array.Sort and List<T>.Sort use quicksort anyway. So we can just do:

Array.Sort(arrayOfFractions, CompareSepDenom);

Or if you aren't going to re-use CompareSepDenom and would rather have an anonymous delegate from a lambda, you could use:

Array.Sort(arrayOfFractions, (x, y) =>
    {
      int cmp = x.Value.CompareTo(y.Value);//normal comparison first
      if(cmp == 0)//same value;
        return x.Numerator.CompareTo(y.Numerator);//put lower numerator (also lower denum) first
      return cmp;
    });

On the other hand, if you're writing the quicksort as an experiment or to learn from the code, note that the fact that you depend upon ICmparer<Fraction> means that you are no longer restricted to coding your method to accept a particular type for which < is defined.

This means you can write a method that is:

public static void QuickSort<T>(T[] arr, int p, int r, IComparer<T> cmp)

That works for all types.

Once you've done that, it's time to compare with the version built into the library.

Edit:

Incidentally, in case you aren't already doing it. Your Fraction class should implement IComparable<Fraction> and IComparable (for backwards-compatibility with .NET1.0) so that people who don't want to create their own comparer delegate or class can just get the normal sorting for fractions (in which 1/2 and 2/4 are equivalent). Once you implement the first:

CompareTo(Fraction other)
{
  if(other == null)//take out this of Fraction is a struct
    return 1;
  return Value.CompareTo(other.Value)
}
CompareTo(object obj)
{
  if(other == null)
    return 1;
  Fraction fract = other as Fract;
  if(fract == null)
    throw new ArgumentException("Can only compare with other factions", "obj");
  return CompareTo(fract);
}

Because Comparer<Fraction>.Default will in turn use this, the version of the sort method that doesn't take a comparer will work, as will other code that depends upon ordering in other ways. Really, for any class for which "the normal way of ordering them" makes sense, or for which you define <, >, <= etc, should have them. You can also route all of those operator overloads through the CompareTo (it'll end up being inlined in practice, so no performance penalty`) which means the same code works for them for just about any such class.

share|improve this answer
    
Just a comment. You define your own class DelegateComparer (should probably be DelegateComparer<T>) that holds a Comparison delegate and uses that to implement IComparer<T>. This is good. Just want to say that in .NET4.5 (Visual Studio 2012) which will soon be released, they have done this in the framework. So with .NET4.5, you could say Comparer<Fraction>.Create(cmp) and get your IComparer<Fraction> from your cmp delegate like that. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Aug 12 '12 at 17:17
    
@JeppeStigNielsen You are correct about DelegateComparer<T>. That is corrected now, thanks. It's about time they made that method public - there's such an obvious need, and they so obviously have one behind the scenes that I've wondered if it was in the library somewhere and I just hadn't found it! –  Jon Hanna Aug 12 '12 at 17:24

I think the comparison you want is something like this:

static int CompareFractions(Fraction a, Fraction b)
{
    // compare the value of the fractions
    int c = (a.numerator * b.denominator).CompareTo(a.denominator * b.numerator);
    if (c == 0)
        // break ties with "lowest numerator first"
        c = a.numerator.CompareTo(b.numerator);
    return c;
}

You could use that as a sorting delegate to a normal Sort method, too.

share|improve this answer
    
Numerator * Denominator? Shouldn't it be / ? –  David Archer Aug 12 '12 at 16:19
    
@DavidArcher no. It's a cross multiplication, one numerator with the denominator of the other fraction. –  harold Aug 12 '12 at 16:23
    
Ahh, you're right. That's what I get for reading before my 2nd cup of coffee. :) –  David Archer Aug 12 '12 at 16:26

Why not just use List<T>.Sort()? It is an implementation of Quick Sort. If you had an IComparable<Fraction> implementation then you could just call Sort(). You could alternatively use the override that takes a delegate if you wanted to pass a specific method.

e.g. if your Fraction class was like this:

    public class Fraction : IComparable<Fraction>
    {
     public int CompareTo(Fraction other)
     {
       // if other equals this, return 0
       // if other is greater than this, return -1
       // if other is less than this, return 1
     }
//...
    }

Then you could just have a List variable and call it's Sort method:

myList.Sort();
share|improve this answer
    
I am forcing myself to write my own quicksort algorithm to get a better understanding of efficient code writing and how algorithms work. Have to start somewhere with learning right? –  LordofTurtles Aug 12 '12 at 16:09
    
First, you need to define how to compare different Fraction objects. Then, you need to perform that comparison in you sort. You could write a sort that does the comparison itself, or you could put the onus on the Fraction class and have it implement IComparable<Fraction> and simply use that in your sort method. In any case, no one can really give you much in the way of specifics without seeing your Fraction class. –  Peter Ritchie Aug 12 '12 at 16:26
    
It has been solved already, but if you are interseted I could paste the class –  LordofTurtles Aug 12 '12 at 17:07

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