Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
name hiding and fragile base problem

I'm familiar with the rules involving member function hiding. Basically, a derived class with a function that has the same name as a base class function doesn't actually overload the base class function - it completely hides it.

struct Base
{
    void foo(int x) const
    {

    }
};

struct Derived : public Base
{
    void foo(const std::string& s) { }
};


int main()
{
    Derived d;
    d.foo("abc");
    d.foo(123); // Will not compile! Base::foo is hidden!
}

So, you can get around this with a using declaration. But my question is, what is the reason for base class function hiding? Is this a "feature" or just a "mistake" by the standards committee? Is there some technical reason why the compiler can't look in the Base class for matching overloads when it doesn't find a match for d.foo(123)?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Xeo, Adel Boutros, Praetorian, Nemo, Johan Lundberg Aug 12 '12 at 19:58

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
@Xeo: I think you're right, that the answer is essentially the same for both questions, but the question itself is different, since Base and Derived used different arguments to foo, so the signatures should have been different (not a "true" override). –  jxh Aug 12 '12 at 16:52
1  
The linked answer does answer my question, but to be honest, I think it's worded a bit indirectly and includes the red herring of virtual functions. So I think THIS question is more likely to be of help to future programmers who are looking for an answer. –  Channel72 Aug 12 '12 at 17:00
    
I'm pretty sure that B.S. explains the rationale in D&E. Sadly, I don't remember it nor have I the book available here. (ISTR that there was a bad interaction with some other rules which have been changed after while the scoping rule weren't, but I may be confusing with something else). –  AProgrammer Aug 12 '12 at 17:41
    
For the record, the related section in D&E is 3.5.3. BS indeed wrote that "In retrospect, I suspect that the overloading rules introduced in 2.0 might have been able to handle this case", but I fail the understand the rest of the explanation why those rules would handled the case he cared about. –  AProgrammer Aug 20 '12 at 9:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Name lookup works by looking in the current scope for matching names, if nothing is found then it looks in the enclosing scope, if nothing is found it looks in the enclosing scope, etc. until reaching the global namespace.

This isn't specific to classes, you get exactly the same name hiding here:

#include <iostream>

namespace outer
{
  void foo(char c) { std::cout << "outer\n"; }

  namespace inner
  {
    void foo(int i) { std::cout << "inner\n"; }

    void bar() { foo('c'); }
  }
}

int main()
{
  outer::inner::bar();
}

Although outer::foo(char) is a better match for the call foo('c') name lookup stops after finding outer::inner::foo(int) (i.e. outer::foo(char) is hidden) and so the program prints inner.

If member function name weren't hidden that would mean name lookup in class scope behaved differently to non-class scope, which would be inconsistent and confusing, and make C++ even harder to learn.

So there's no technical reason the name lookup rules couldn't be changed, but they'd have to be changed for member functions and other types of name lookup, it would make compilers slower because they'd have to continue searching for names even after finding matching names in the current scope. Sensibly, if there's a name in the current scope it's probably the one you wanted. A call in a scope A probably wants to find names in that scope, e.g. if two functions are in the same namespace they're probably related (part of the same module or library) and so if one uses the name of the other it probably means to call the one in the same scope. If that's not what you want then use explicit qualification or a using declaration to tell the compiler the other name should be visible in that scope.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't buy the "it would make the compilers slower". The current rule is so problematic that some compilers emit a warning. –  AProgrammer Aug 12 '12 at 17:56
    
AFAIK such warnings are only emitted for member functions, not non-members, and my point is that the rules are the same for members and non-members. Presumably compilers warn for member functions because for some reason more people are surprised when it happens in class scope, maybe just because they don't understand how C++ name lookup works. –  Jonathan Wakely Aug 12 '12 at 18:01
    
... and the warning is emitted when the class is defined, not when names are looked up. Functions are defined once, they're usually called a lot more often in more places. If name lookup continued in every enclosing scope all the way to the global namespace it would certainly affect lookup times, whether it's noticeable would depend how deeply namespaces are nested, but it takes more work to keep looking in other scopes after finding the name, fact. Name lookup for non-members must look in namespaces which might contain hundreds of names and be more deeply nested than classes. –  Jonathan Wakely Aug 12 '12 at 18:04
    
Finally, the rule isn't problematic - the rule works fine, the warnings just make sure programmers know the rule and are aware how their code will work. –  Jonathan Wakely Aug 12 '12 at 18:06

Is this a "feature" or just a "mistake" by the standards committee?

It's definitely not a mistake, since it's clearly stipulated in the standard. It's a feature.

Is there some technical reason why the compiler can't look in the Base class for matching overloads when it doesn't find a match for d.foo(123)?

Technically, a compiler could look in the base class. Technically. But if it did, it would break the rules set by the standard.

But my question is, what is the reason for base class function hiding?

Unless someone from the committee comes with an answer, I think we can only speculate. Basically, there were two options:

  • if I declare a function with the same name in a derived class, keep the base class's functions with the same name directly accessible through a derived class
  • don't

It could have been determined by flipping a coin (...ok, maybe not).

In general, what are the reasons for wanting a function with the same name as that of a base class? There's different functionality - where you'd more likely use polymorphism instead. For handling different cases (different parameters), and if these cases aren't present in the base class, a strategy pattern might be more appropriate to handle the job. So most likely function hiding comes in effect when you actually do want to hide the function. You're not happy with the base class implementation so you provide your own, with the option of using using, but only when you want to.

I think it's just a mechanism to make you think twice before having a function with the same name & different signature.

share|improve this answer

I believe @Lol4t0 is pretty much correct, but I'd state things much more strongly. If you allowed this, you'd end up with two possibilities: either make a lot of other changes throughout almost the entirety of the language, or else you end up with something almost completely broken.

The other changes you'd make to allow this to work would be to completely revamp how overloading is done -- you'd have to change at least the order of the steps that were taken, and probably the details of the steps themselves. Right now, the compiler looks up the name, then forms an overload set, resolves the overload, then checks access to the chosen overload.

To make this work even sort of well, you'd pretty much have to change that to check access first, and only add accessible functions to the overload set. With that, at least the example in @Lol4t0's answer could continue to compile, because Base::foo would never be added to the overload set.

That still means, however, that adding to the interface of the base class could cause serious problems. If Base didn't originally contain foo, and a public foo were added, then the call in main to d.foo() would suddenly do something entirely different, and (again) it would be entirely outside the control of whoever wrote Derived.

To cure that, you'd just about have to make a fairly fundamental change in the rules: prohibit implicit conversions of function arguments. Along with that, you'd change overload resolution so in case of a tie, the most derived/most local version of a function was favored over a less derived/outer scope. With those rules, the call to d.foo(5.0) could never resolve to Derived::foo(int) in the first place.

That, however, would only leave two possibilities: either calls to free functions would have different rules than calls to member functions (implicit conversions allowed only for free functions) or else all compatibility with C would be discarded entirely (i.e., also prohibit implicit conversions in all function arguments, which would break huge amounts of existing code).

To summarize: to change this without breaking the language entirely, you'd have to make quite a few other changes as well. It would almost certainly be possible to create a language that worked that way, but by the time you were done it wouldn't be C++ with one minor change -- it would be an entirely different language that wasn't much like C++ or C, or much of anything else.

share|improve this answer

I can only propose, that this decision was made to make things simpler.

Imagine, that derived function will overload base one. Then, does the following code should generate compilation error, or use Deriveds function?

struct Base
{
private:
    void foo(float);
}

struct Derived: public Base
{
public:
    void foo(int);
}

int main()
{
    Derived d;
    d.foo(5.0f);
}

According to existing behavior of overloads this should generate error.

Now imagine, in the first version Base had no foo(float). In second version it appears. Now changing the realization of base class breaks interface of derived.

If you are developer of Derived and cannot influence developers of Base and a lot of clients use your interface, you are in a bad situation now.

share|improve this answer
    
According to existing behavior of overloads this should generate error. It wouldn't generate an error, it would just call Derived::foo() and cast the float to an int –  Channel72 Aug 12 '12 at 17:22
    
@Channel72, Baecause Base::foo is hidden. If wont it should behave like this: ideone.com/HSARl –  Lol4t0 Aug 12 '12 at 17:25

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.