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Simple jQuery ajax call and response using jQuery 1.8 and Kohana:

$.ajax({
    data:{
        file: file  
},
    dataType: 'json',
    url: 'media/delete',
    contentType: 'application/json; charset=utf-8',
    type: 'GET',
    complete: function(response){
        console.log(response);
        console.log(response.file);
    }
});

The PHP for the URL is a simple json_encode() page that returns:

{"file":"uploaded\/img\/Screen Shot 2012-04-21 at 2.17.06 PM-610.png"}

Which is valid JSON according to JSLint.

The response headers are, according to firebug:

Response Headers
Connection  Keep-Alive
Content-Length  74
Content-Type    application/json
Date    Sun, 12 Aug 2012 17:44:39 GMT
Keep-Alive  timeout=5, max=97
Server  Apache/2.4.1 (Unix) PHP/5.4.0
X-Powered-By    PHP/5.4.0

But in the success function "response" is not the JS object I am expecting, I cannot access response.file. Instead it seems to be some sort of response object with fields like readyState, responseText, status, etc.

There are many questions similar to this here, but I believe I have everything wired up correctly according to other answers.

What am I missing here?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The complete: callback does not provide the response as it's argument. From the jQuery doc for $.ajax():

complete(jqXHR, textStatus)

So, what you are seeing as the argument to your complete function is the jqXHR object, not the parsed response. This is likely because complete gets called when the ajax call is done whether it was successful or not. It is the success handler that gets the successfully parsed JSON response.

You probably want to use the success: callback instead.

$.ajax({
    data: {file: file},
    dataType: 'json',
    url: 'media/delete',
    contentType: 'application/json; charset=utf-8',
    type: 'GET',
    success: function(response){
        console.log(response);
        console.log(response.file);
    }
});
share|improve this answer
    
Oh wow, I figured it was something that obvious that I just couldn't see, thanks. –  user1391445 Aug 13 '12 at 12:49

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