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I have a dictionary:

my_dictionary = {"058498":"table", "064165":"pen", "055123":"pencil"}

I iterate over it:

for item in my_dictionary:
    PDF = r'C:\Users\user\Desktop\File_%s.pdf' %item
    doIt(PDF)

def doIt(PDF):
    part = MIMEBase('application', "octet-stream")
    part.set_payload( open(PDF,"rb").read() )

But I get this error:

IOError: [Errno 2] No such file or directory: 'C:\\Users\\user\\Desktop\\File_055123.pdf'

It can't find my file. Why does it think there are double backslashes in file path?

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3  
There is just a single backslash. You're seeing the string representation. The file doesn't exist. –  Tim Pietzcker Aug 12 '12 at 18:36
2  
The double backslash is not wrong, python prints/represents it that to the user way. If a = r'raw s\tring' and b = 'raw s\\tring' (no 'r' and explicit double slash) then they are both represented as 'raw s\\tring'. –  aneroid Aug 12 '12 at 18:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The double backslash is not wrong, python prints/represents it that to the user way. If a = r'raw s\tring' and b = 'raw s\\tring' (no 'r' and explicit double slash) then they are both represented as 'raw s\\tring'.

>>> a = r'raw s\tring'
>>> b = 'raw s\\tring'
>>> a
'raw s\\tring'
>>> b
'raw s\\tring'

Btw, your code is clearly edited and mismatched between the actual and what you posted since there's an obvious difference in the error message and the filename:

You have:

PDF = r'C:\Users\user\Desktop\File_%s.pdf' %item

but the output shows:

'C:\\Users\\user\\Desktop\\Filed_055123.pdf'

Note the extra d in the file name Filed_ vs File_. The error message may be coming from the part you've edited.

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there's no d: 'C:\\Users\\user\\Desktop\\File_055123.pdf' –  Ashwini Chaudhary Aug 12 '12 at 19:00
    
Probably been edited out now. –  aneroid Aug 13 '12 at 16:49

Double backslashes are due to r, raw string:

r'C:\Users\user\Desktop\File_%s.pdf' ,

It is used because the \ might escape some of the characters.

>>> strs = "c:\desktop\notebook"

>>> print strs                #here print thinks that \n in \notebook is the newline char
c:\desktop
otebook

>>> strs = r"c:\desktop\notebook"  #using r'' escapes the \
>>> print strs

c:\desktop\notebook

>>> print repr(strs)   #actual content of strs
'c:\\desktop\\notebook'
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It doesn't. Double backslash is just the way of the computer of saying backslash. Yes, I know this sounds weird, but think of it this way - in order to represent special characters, backslash was chosen as an escaping character (e.g. \n means newline, and not the backslash character followed by the n character). But what happens if you actually want to print (or use) a backslash (possibly followed by more characters), but you don't want the computer to treat it as an escaping character? In that case we escape the backslash itself, meaning we use a double backslash so the computer will understand it's a single backslash.

It's done automatically in your case because of the r you added before the string.

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