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Here is basically what my class layout is:

GameDriver.h:

#ifndef GAMEDRIVER_H
#define GAMEDRIVER_H
#include "CameraSystem.h"

class CameraSystem; //Forward declaration

class GameDriver {
    //Stuff
};

#endif

CameraSystem.h:

#ifndef CAMERASYSTEM_H
#define CAMERASYSTEM_H
#include "Tickable.h"

class GameDriver;
class CameraSystem: public Tickable { //Complains here
    //Stuff
};

#endif

Tickable.h:

#ifndef TICKABLE_H
#define TICKABLE_H
#include "GameDriver.h"
class GameDriver;
class Tickable {
    //Stuff
};

#endif

Here is the error I get:

CameraSystem.h:9 error: expected class-name before '{' token

Forward declaring Tickable does not work either. Any help? Thanks in advance.

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I've looked around Google, by the way. None of the solutions Google gives me work. –  Jode Aug 12 '12 at 18:40
    
Do you have include guards in your headers? –  jahhaj Aug 12 '12 at 18:43
1  
you are forward declaring some classes and including the headers. –  juanchopanza Aug 12 '12 at 18:43
    
Oh, sorry, I have header guards in my real code. Let me edit them in. –  Jode Aug 12 '12 at 18:44
    
I think, the best you can do now is to remove include from gamedriver.h or tckable.h to break circular dependencies and try to resolve errors. Until you do it, you are stuck. –  Lol4t0 Aug 12 '12 at 19:11

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can't resolve such circular dependencies. However, you've got the solution (partially):

I.e. instead of including a header, just use a forward declaration. If you do this right, there shouldn't be any issues. However, try to group your program into logical elements/groups and only add cross-references if they're requied (e.g. the game has to know about and access the camera, but the camera shouldn't have to access the game system as a whole).

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I decided to go with your advice and restructure my code. It compiles fine now. Thanks. –  Jode Aug 12 '12 at 19:12

If you forward delcare a class you shouldn't include the class' header.

#include "CameraSystem.h" // DO NOT INCLUDE THIS

class CameraSystem; //Forward declaration

class GameDriver {
    //Stuff
};
share|improve this answer
    
Removing the include throws a whole host of new errors. Removing the forward declaration doesn't, but the current error still remains. –  Jode Aug 12 '12 at 18:51
1  
@Jode if you can't remove the include, then you cannot really forward declare the class. –  juanchopanza Aug 12 '12 at 18:52
    
If removing the include generates more errors, you may be using parts of the forward declarated class inside the header, which the compiler doesn't know about. But simply put: An include is just a text replacement command - therefore if you already include the full-blown class definition, you don't need anymore forward declarations. –  Excelcius Aug 12 '12 at 18:58
    
Actually, where I couldn't remove the include, I removed the forward declaration. As I said, doesn't break anything, nor does it fix anything. –  Jode Aug 12 '12 at 18:58
    
@jode the forward declaration is irrelevant without the include. Either you remove all the code that requires the include, or you redesign the classes. –  juanchopanza Aug 12 '12 at 18:59

Ok, I see two problems here.

First: Your forward declarations are useless. You are writing (using GameDriver.h: as an example):

#include "CameraSystem.h"

class CameraSystem; //Forward declaration

class GameDriver {
    //Stuff
};

Here CameraSystem will already be known by including CameraSystem.h, so the forward declaration is nonsense. What you meant to write was:

class CameraSystem; //Forward declaration

class GameDriver {
    //Stuff
};

Second: Where you really would need a forward declaration you cannot use it, as you cannot derive from a forward declared class:

#include "Tickable.h"

class CameraSystem: public Tickable { //Complains here
    //Stuff
};

Note that a forward declaration works only if you are not using the forward declared class directly as a class member. You are then restricted to pointers or references to the forward declared class. The reason for this is, that the compiler does not know the memory layout of the class unless its completely known (i.e. by including the header file). For example:

class CameraSystem;
class GameDriver {
  CameraSystem m_cameraSystem;
};

will NOT work. However,

class CameraSystem;
class GameDriver {
  CameraSystem *m_cameraSystem;
  CameraSystem& m_otherCameraSystem;
};

will. Of course you will still have to include the correct header files in your *.cpp file.

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You cannot derive from forward declared class –  Lol4t0 Aug 12 '12 at 18:53
    
Oh...true...sorry :/ –  cli_hlt Aug 12 '12 at 18:54
    
True, Lol4t0. Also, header guards are there in my real code; see my comment on the original question. –  Jode Aug 12 '12 at 18:57
    
I've edited my answer accordingly. Maybe the final part is your poblem. –  cli_hlt Aug 12 '12 at 19:03

You can't inherit from a class that has not been declared.

Pre-processing Tickable.h gives you:

class GameDriver;
class CameraSystem: public Tickable { //Complains here
    //Stuff
};

class CameraSystem; //Forward declaration

class GameDriver {
    //Stuff
};

class GameDriver;
class Tickable {
    //Stuff
};

See how Tickable hasn't even been forward declared when you inherit from it?

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Even if it had been forward-declared, you still couldn't inherit from it. The subclass needs to know about its base to be created. –  WendiKidd Aug 12 '12 at 19:12

Try adding #pragma once at the very beginning of each header file.

You should somehow tell the compiler to only put those once. That's one way. Another is using #ifndef X and #define X.

If this doesn't solve it, try to just eliminate the circular dependency - it doesn't seem like it has to happen...

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Even with proper include guards (no matter whether you use #ifdef or #pragma once) you can't do circular dependencies, as the preprocessor will try to follow each and every #include which results in a stack overflow (essentially due to your includes having an "infinite depth"). –  Mario Aug 12 '12 at 18:49
    
If you have #includes inside an #ifndef block that isn't compiled (since it was already defined in the previous include), they won't be included, so that should solve your circular dependency... –  Eran Zimmerman Aug 12 '12 at 18:53
    
Yes, if you do it the proper way (defining before using #include), yet I'd call it bad practice (and a possible error source). But if done right, it will work, yes (not my downvote though). –  Mario Aug 12 '12 at 18:56
    
It's good practice to always put the include guards first (except, maybe, some documentation). I do agree that the problem should be avoided altogether with correct #includes... –  Eran Zimmerman Aug 12 '12 at 18:59

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