Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a file with a few thousand lines of data, each line is like: a:b:c:d

So for example:

0.0:2000.00:2000.04:2000.02

I want to get all a's in one file, b's in second file etc. How?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

One way. Output files will be named fileX, with X for each column number.

Assuming infile with content:

0.0:2000.00:2000.04:2001.02
0.1:2002.00:2000.05:2003.02
0.2:2003.00:2002.04:2004.02
0.3:2001.00:2000.05:2000.03
0.3:2001.00:2000.04:2001.02
0.2:2001.00:2002.04:2000.02

Execute this awk command:

awk '
    BEGIN {
        FS = ":";
    }

    {
        for ( i = 1; i <= NF; i++ ) {
            print $i > "file" i;
        }
    }
' infile

Check output files:

head file[1234]

With following result:

==> file1 <==
0.0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.3
0.2

==> file2 <==
2000.00
2002.00
2003.00
2001.00
2001.00
2001.00

==> file3 <==
2000.04
2000.05
2002.04
2000.05
2000.04
2002.04

==> file4 <==
2001.02
2003.02
2004.02
2000.03
2001.02
2000.02
share|improve this answer
2  
Nice, but 11 lines of script for a one-liner is a bit excessive. –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 12 '12 at 19:31

Look at the awk (or gawk) manual.

You should use the -F: flag to set the field separator to :.

You should use print with > file to get the outputs to the file you want.

awk -F: '{ for (i = 1; i <= NF; i++) { file = "file." i; print $i > file; } }' input

(awk on Mac OS X 10.7.4 does not permit an expression as the file name; gawk does. The solution shown will work on both.)

[Answer for homework given to counter a (now cancelled—thank you) down-vote that was IMNSHO gratuitously wrong!]

share|improve this answer
    
Or man cut perhaps. –  tripleee Aug 12 '12 at 19:11
    
@tripleee: cut does not do the I/O redirection in a single pass over the data. For small files, rescanning doesn't matter. For pipelines (no file) or large files, it might (though there are ways around 'no file' in a pipeline, of course). –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 12 '12 at 19:20
1  
+1 to counter the IMHO frivolous downvote. –  tripleee Aug 12 '12 at 19:27

What about:

cat filename|cut -d ':' -f1 > a.txt

Then you can write -f2 for the second field and put it in b.txt.

share|improve this answer
    
You can do this (use cut 4 times); it involves 4 passes over the file for 4 fields, which doesn't matter much if the file exists and is small, but becomes a nuisance if there isn't a file (it is a result generated in a pipeline, for example), or if the file is large (for a suitable definition of large, which is probably measured in multiples of megabyte). You also win a UUOC award. –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 12 '12 at 19:25
1  
The cat is Useless. partmaps.org/era/unix/award.html –  tripleee Aug 12 '12 at 19:28
    
Yeah, I see! Of course if it isn't a file, but something like a stream of data, you can't use this. But it's not the question. For very large file you're right, it's a waste of time. Ps: really a funny award! –  Simone-Cu Aug 12 '12 at 19:33

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.