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I've encountered a problem(error C2761) while writing specializations for a class. My classes are as follows:

class Print{
public:
    typedef class fontA;
    typedef class fontB;
    typedef class fontC;
    typedef class fontD;

    template<class T>
    void startPrint(void) { return; };
    virtual bool isValidDoc(void) = 0;
};

I have a class QuickPrint which inherits the Print class:

class QuickPrint : public Print {
       ...
};

The error occurs when I try to write specializations for the startPrint method:

template<>        // <= C2716 error given here
void QuickPrint::startPrint<fontA>(void)
{
      /// implementation
}

template<>        // <= C2716 error given here
void QuickPrint::startPrint<fontB>(void)
{
     /// implementation
}

The error appears for the remaining specializations as well.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

QuickPrint does not have a template member function named startPrint, so specializing QuickPrint::startPrint is an error. If you repeat the template definition in QuickPrint the specializations are okay:

class QuickPrint : public Print {
   template<class T>
    void startPrint(void) { return; };
 };

template<>        // <= C2716 error given here
void QuickPrint::startPrint<Print::fontA>(void)
{
      /// implementation
}

But if the goal here is to be able to call into QuickPrint polymorphically, you're in trouble, because the template function in Print can't be marked virtual.

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Thanks, adding the default implementation into the derived class worked. –  Sebi Aug 12 '12 at 20:38
    
That appears to be dangerous. If now some function of Print calls startPrint, the specialization he wrote is not chosen because he didn't specialize Print's member function template. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Aug 12 '12 at 20:40
    
Yes, that's what I said; it's not polymorphic. –  Pete Becker Aug 12 '12 at 20:43
    
@PeteBecker i see what you mean now. thanks! –  Johannes Schaub - litb Aug 12 '12 at 21:22

try this:

class QuickPrint : public Print {
    template<class T>
    void startPrint(void) { Print::startPrint<T>(); };
};
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This one works as well. Thanks. –  Sebi Aug 12 '12 at 20:41

Your issue is this line:

template<class T> 
void startPrint(void) { return; }; 

You already provide a function body, but then try to redefine it again (using specialization), which won't work.

Remove that function body and it should work.

To define a default behaviour, provide a default value for template paramter T and then add a single specialization for that one.

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