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i need two class which are form a circulation, both have ther own members but along with a copy of other class, lets consider this example.

class lower; 
class upper{
    int uA;
    lower L;
    upper(){
    uA=0;   
    //how to initialize lower here using lower's constructor 
    }
};

class lower{
    int lA;
    upper U;
    lower(){
    lA=0; 
    //how to initialize upper here using upper's constructor 
   }

};

now i need a upper object upper L in main(); and i want all variable of it initialize with zero (for default constructor) but i don't now how to handle circulation of these constructor so get initialed lower L within upper

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marked as duplicate by Kerrek SB, Blastfurnace, Bo Persson, nKn, Frédéric Hamidi Mar 4 '14 at 10:06

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
This layout is impossible in C++. At least one of L or U must be a pointer or reference. –  kennytm Aug 12 '12 at 20:34
    
ok you can modify this example as you want. can use pointers but i only need that when i initialize upper with zero its lower also get zero . –  netsmertia Aug 12 '12 at 20:38
    
why do you need an instance of upper in lower if you already have a lower in upper? –  Gir Aug 12 '12 at 20:44
    
We had this same question just earlier. –  Kerrek SB Aug 12 '12 at 20:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use something like this:

class upper;
class lower{
    friend class upper;
    int lA;
    upper* U;
    void setUpper(upper* u)
    {
        U = u;
    }
    public:

    lower(){
    lA=0; 
    U = 0; 
   }
};

class upper{
    int uA;
    lower* L;
    public:
    upper(lower* l){
    uA=0;   
    L = l;
    l->setUpper(this); 
    }
};

int main()
{
    lower* l = new lower();
    upper* u = new upper(l);
    return 0;
}

Although you need to add desctructors to clean up the pointers, as appropriate, or delete lower from upper?

Also you should investigate your datastructures and see if you could get rid of the circular dependency - it's likely to cause you problems in future.

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or you could avoid the mess and just have a regular instance of lower inside upper? –  Gir Aug 12 '12 at 20:51
    
thanks. i will try to remove circular dependency but i think this type of situation very common. –  netsmertia Aug 12 '12 at 21:17

Like this, (as KennyTM says you need to use pointers)

class lower; 

class upper
{
    int uA;
    lower* L;
    upper() : uA(0), L(new L)
    {
    }
};

class lower
{
    int lA;
    upper* U;
    lower() : lA(0), U(new U)
    {
    }
};

There's plenty of issues with this code, but hopefully it answers your question.

share|improve this answer
    
isn't this an infinite loop? –  Gir Aug 12 '12 at 20:45
    
@Gir oops, you are right. –  jahhaj Aug 12 '12 at 20:46
    
Don't know who up voted my answer, it's garbage. I'd delete it if I could. –  jahhaj Aug 12 '12 at 20:49
2  
i did. i like infinite loops –  Gir Aug 12 '12 at 20:49

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