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I have an array of arrays indicating coordinate values, like so:

cells = [ [0,0], [0,1] ]

Each array in the array is an X and Y value. So, if I want to shift this right, that would be X+1 on each cell. I could express this as a cell like so:

delta = [1,0]

Now, what I'd like to do is merge that value into each cell so that the X value of each cell is summed with the value of delta, so in this case the final output should be:

new_cells = [ [1,0], [1,1] ]

Here's the best I've been able to think of so far, it seems really heavy:

cells = [[0,0],[0,1]]
delta = [1,0]
cells.each do |cell|
  cell[0] = cell[0] + delta[0]
  cell[1] = cell[1] + delta[1]
end
# Now cells = [[1,0],[1,1]]

Is there a cleaner one-liner kind of method that would sum an array onto each array in a chain of arrays, or is the above the best solution to that problem?

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needs it to be an in-place update? you lose some nice things doing it this way... –  tokland Aug 13 '12 at 8:05
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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think your best solution is to recognize that cells and deltas are a different data type that you could operate on more clearly if it weren't an array:

Cell = Struct.new(:x, :y) do 
  def + other
    Cell.new(self.x + other.x, self.y + other.y)
  end
end

# cells is some array of Cell objects
# delta is some Cell object

cells.map! {|cell| cell + delta}
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This is an interesting take. I think it yields potentially the cleanest implementation, and building from Struct allows a very concise definition. Thanks for all the input, I like this one the best! –  Andrew Aug 13 '12 at 3:13
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Here:

cells = cells.map {|c| [c[0] + delta[0], c[1] + delta[1]] }
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cells.map! {|x, y| [x + delta[0], y + delta[1]] }

Note that Linuxios's answer, my answer, and your solution all have different effects if somebody else has a reference to the cells array or to one of the cells contained in the array. Only your answer modifies the original cells in place, so with my solution or Linuxios's solution references might still point to old data.

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In this answer if you're using #map! wouldn't that modify the cells in place? Assuming none of the constituent cells are stored as variables elsewhere once cells is bang mapped I'm not sure I see how the old values would still be around... –  Andrew Aug 12 '12 at 23:10
    
@Andrew: If one of the cells is referenced elsewhere, my solution will not update that reference, but yours will. If the cells array is referenced elsewhere, Linuxios's solution will not update that reference, but your solution and my solution will. –  Ken Bloom Aug 13 '12 at 1:44
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cells.map {|cell| cell.zip(delta).map{|x, y| x + y }}

I don't consider this cleaner than the other solutions that have been proposed.

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+1. that's what I'd have written, and it works regardless of the vector size. –  tokland Aug 12 '12 at 22:50
    
I'm not really familiar with #zip. I see the docs, but it remains a bit unclear to me. Would you mind elaborating a bit on what #zip is doing in this case? –  Andrew Aug 12 '12 at 23:08
    
@Andrew: [1,2,3].zip([4,5,6]) gives the result [[1,4],[2,5],[3,6]]. –  Ken Bloom Aug 13 '12 at 1:45
    
@tokland: since the cells and deltas are known to contain two values, I think that the additional work to generalize the solution makes things less clear. –  Ken Bloom Aug 13 '12 at 1:46
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Here's how you don't have to worry about matching the cell keys with delta's:

cells = cells.map {|cell| [cell,delta].transpose.map {|value| value.reduce(:+)}}

Step by step:

cells = cells.map { |cell|         # => [0,0]

  combined = [cell, delta]         # => [[0,0], [1,0]]

  transposed = combined.transpose  # => [[0, 1], [0, 0]]

  new_c = transposed.map { |value| # => [0, 1]

    value.reduce(:+)               # => 1, => 0

  }

  new_c                            # => [1,0] As expected for first cell.
}

cells                              # => [[1,0],[1,1]] Final result

With another sample data:

cells = [[0,0],[1,1],[2,2]]
delta = [1,1]
plug  = Proc.new {
  cells = cells.map { |cell| [cell, delta].transpose.map { |value| value.reduce(:+) } }
}

plug.call # => [[1, 1], [2, 2], [3, 3]]
plug.call # => [[2, 2], [3, 3], [4, 4]]
plug.call # => [[3, 3], [4, 4], [5, 5]]
plug.call # => [[4, 4], [5, 5], [6, 6]]
plug.call # => [[5, 5], [6, 6], [7, 7]]

Another one:

cells = [[0,0,0],[0,1,2],[1,2,3],[2,3,4]]
delta = [3,2,1]

plug.call # => [[3, 2, 1],   [3, 3, 3],   [4, 4, 4],   [5, 5, 5]]
plug.call # => [[6, 4, 2],   [6, 5, 4],   [7, 6, 5],   [8, 7, 6]]
plug.call # => [[9, 6, 3],   [9, 7, 5],   [10, 8, 6],  [11, 9, 7]]
plug.call # => [[12, 8, 4],  [12, 9, 6],  [13, 10, 7], [14, 11, 8]]
plug.call # => [[15, 10, 5], [15, 11, 7], [16, 12, 8], [17, 13, 9]]

Hope this answers your question better.

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1  
1) I'd write [cell,delta].transpose -> cell.zip(delta). 2) I think that reduce is not necessary, when you zip a vector with the delta you have always 2 values, so no need to reduce, just some the pair. So that's Ken Bloom's answer. –  tokland Aug 12 '12 at 22:50
1  
Very interesting approach, thanks for the thorough step-by-step! –  Andrew Aug 12 '12 at 23:04
    
@tokland: agreed –  Gurpartap Singh Aug 13 '12 at 18:08
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