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Is there a way in grep/egrep to extract tricky patterns from this text, insert them at the start of a line with its line remainder, so that it looks like the following?

Raw text that has been extracted from many files which have the word "nonspecific". Now I need to organize these so that the names start at the start of the line so that they are easier to read. It would help to insert a blank line in between them as well but that may be not possible in egrep?

Input:

SofasCouchesChairs/Type1234567.xml:Nonspecific Couch-W ISSUESTablesDesks/Type123765.xml:Nonspecific Tables issues BedsDivans/Type4567345.xml:Nonspecific bed abnormalitiesBedBugs/Type2893993.xml:Nonspecific bugs in the spring boxes related to the mattressBed_Sofas/Type1317994.xml:Nonspecific WR abnormalities these are from Radios_TV/Type1274978.xml:radiation perhaps with nonspecific cell phones and cell towers Cabinets_TelephoneWires/Type1299691.xml:DATA:all kinds of nonspecific cell phone wave changes, with a 

Expected output:

SofasCouchesChairs/Type1234567.xml:Nonspecific Couch-W ISSUES

TablesDesks/Type123765.xml:Nonspecific Tables issues 

BedsDivans/Type4567345.xml:Nonspecific bed abnormalities

BedBugs/Type2893993.xml:Nonspecific bugs in the spring boxes related to the mattress

Bed_Sofas/Type1317994.xml:Nonspecific WR abnormalities these are from 

Radios_TV/Type1274978.xml:radiation perhaps with nonspecific cell phones and cell towers

Cabinets_TelephoneWires/Type1299691.xml:DATA:all kinds of nonspecific cell phone wave changes, with a 
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I need to organize these so that the names start at the start of the line. Could you explain what constitutes a name? –  djf Aug 12 '12 at 22:42
    
@djf Yes, I'm sorry. The organized text did not appear as I wanted them to in the box above. They got jumbled together. Each name looks like "BedBugs/Type2893993.xml:" and should start at the beginning of the line. –  nlper Aug 12 '12 at 22:46
    
@nlper: How should we handle, for example, abnormalitiesBedBugs/Type2893993.xml: or ISSUESTablesDesks/Type123765.xml:? –  Steve Aug 13 '12 at 4:12
    
@nlper: When you extracted your raw text from many files which have the word "nonspecific", were you able to set some sort of delimiter? In your case, a null delimiter makes downstream manipulation much much harder. –  Steve Aug 13 '12 at 4:16
1  
@nlper: I'm a little confused about what your input looks like. You can indent text with 4 spaces to start a code block. I've attempted to update your input, but I may not be understanding correctly. Please adjust accordingly. I do think however that your problem may stem from the copying to notepad. You should avoid this. I am assuming you are searching for multiple patterns. If you are calling grep multiple times, simply append to your file i.e: grep "pattern" input >> output. Or you can search for multiple patterns like this: grep -P "yourexpression|anotherexpression" input > output.txt –  Steve Aug 13 '12 at 11:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

See comments; the input is actually:

SofasCouchesChairs/Type1234567.xml:Nonspecific Couch-W ISSUES
TablesDesks/Type123765.xml:Nonspecific Tables issues 
BedsDivans/Type4567345.xml:Nonspecific bed abnormalities
BedBugs/Type2893993.xml:Nonspecific bugs in the spring boxes related to the mattress
Bed_Sofas/Type1317994.xml:Nonspecific WR abnormalities these are from 
Radios_TV/Type1274978.xml:radiation perhaps with nonspecific cell phones and cell towers
Cabinets_TelephoneWires/Type1299691.xml:DATA:all kinds of nonspecific cell phone wave changes, with a

You can double space your output to match the expected output:

sed G input.txt > output.txt

An aside, if your are trying to make things easier to read, you can experiment with the number of G's. For example, this will triple space your file:

sed G;G input.txt > output.txt

Also, to make the changes directly to your file, you can using the -i flag (this saves us from having to unnecessarily create output.txt):

sed -i G input.txt
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