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I have some code to create a new thread, and then a handler and looper within that thread. The calling thread may then post to this handler:

class MyClass {

    Handler mHandler = null;
    Thread mThread = null;

    MyClass() {
        mThread = new Thread() {
            public void run() {
                Looper.prepare();
                mHandler = new Handler();
                Looper.loop();
            }
        };

        mThread.start();

        /* ... */

        mHandler.post(...);
    }
}

This code is almost directly out of an example in the documentation. But I can't understand how it can be correct. Because mHandler is initialized inside the child thread, no guarantees can be made about when that happens. What stops this code from posting to a null handler in the final line?

If this code is incorrect, then what's the way to make a handler on a newly created thread in a synchronous way?

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how/where is mHandler defined? –  Dmitry Beransky Aug 12 '12 at 22:48
    
The above code occurs in the constructor of a class. mHandler and mLooper are fields of that class, and are not otherwise initialized. –  Dorje Aug 12 '12 at 22:58
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3 Answers

I will use this way to do the job, I thought it's not the best one, just want to know more good ideas on it, so I throw this out.

mThread = new Thread() {

    public void run() {
        Looper.prepare();
        mLooper = Looper.myLooper();
        mHandler = new Handler();
        Looper.loop();
        }
    };

mThread.start();

......
timeout = 0;
mHandler2 = new Handler ();
DetectHandlerIsReady detect = new DetectHandlerIsReady ();
detect.run ();

class DetectHandlerIsReady implements Runnable {
    public void run ()
    {
         if (mHandler != null) { 
              mHandler.post (....);
         } else if (timeout <= 30) {
              timeout++;
              mHandler2.postDelay (detect, 1000);
              return;
         } 

         // timeout, and mHandler is not ready yet
    }
}
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Your suggestion seems to be to use a second handler to post the construction of the first handler back to the main thread. Possible, but inelegant. –  Dorje Aug 12 '12 at 23:01
    
Yes it's working fine, but not elegant, as I knew, mHandler should be inside thread, not outside of it, also seems it's not necessary to put it outside of thread, a handler inside thread is to update UI main thread so put it outside of thread, seems not necessary, what u think? –  Tom Aug 13 '12 at 0:34
1  
More elegant would be to use a semaphore. Create the semaphore in the parent thread, before the start() call. Then release in the child thread, after the handler is made. Acquire it in the parent thread, just once, sometime before the handler is used. Still, I feel this should be doable without any extra locks - and I'm extremely confused why this seemingly bad piece of code is being given as an example (although I now cannot find the example that I took it from...perhaps it is just a bad example). –  Dorje Aug 13 '12 at 0:59
    
Thanks, that's much better! –  Tom Aug 13 '12 at 1:12
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In your example what is Looper(where is it declared)? Threads are lightweight processes they are created within a process and share its data. A thread can in turn create a new thread(a child thread) which in turn can create another thread and s.o.. You might want to take a look at mutexes, locks and semaphores.

You can use flags(visible to a group of threads) to determine their behaviour.

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Not relevant to my question. Visibility is not an issue. The issue is that mHandler is initiated in the worker thread, but is accessed without synchronization from the main thread. –  Dorje Aug 12 '12 at 23:02
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The easiest way is to use a HandlerThread:

class MyClass {

    final Handler mHandler = null;
    final HandlerThread mThread = null;

    MyClass() {
        mThread = new HandlerThread("...");
        mThread.start();
        mHandler = new Handler(mThread.getLooper());

        /* ... */

        mHandler.post(...);
    }
}

This short-circuits the synchronization problem because the looper is created inside Thread.start(), and therefore the handler can be linked to that looper within the parent thread.

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