Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm having an issue where my iOS App is crashing on exit and I've narrowed it down to this:

// File.h

struct Name {
    NSString *name;
}

// File.mm

Name names[] = {
    @"foo",
    @"bar",
};

When the App exits (pushing the home button on the iPad), I get a crash in objc_msgSend with a EXC_BAD_ACCESS (SIGSEGV). It's happening the the destructor Name::~Name().

0   libobjc.A.dylib         0x37586e3a objc_release + 10
1   MyApp                   0x0014abfc Name::~Name() (NameManager.h:21)
2   MyApp                   0x0014ab42 Name::~Name() (NameManager.h:21)
3   MyApp                   0x0014ad94 __cxx_global_array_dtor + 120
4  libsystem_c.dylib        0x36bba1cc __cxa_finalize + 216
5  libsystem_c.dylib        0x36b854f6 exit + 6

Keep in mind that this is in a .mm file, so it's being compiled as obj-c++.

This has worked fine for months and months. I don't know exactly when it started happening, but I suspect it was when I updated to xcode 4.4.

NSString literals should be protected (or always have been) against multiple releases, but I don't think that is happening here anyway.

Does anyone know if something changed in xcode 4.4?

I can fix the crash by doing:

struct Name {
    __unsafe_unretained NSString *name;
}

But I hate to do that without understanding why what has worked before no longer works. Or maybe it never should have worked. I also fear a memory over-write, so this might just be a symptom.

This happens in both DEBUG and RELEASE.

UPDATE: I put a breakpoint in ~Name() and verified that memory is not corrupt. LLDB is able to dump the NSString OK. But it crashes when I step.

share|improve this question
3  
Are you migrating to ARC? –  Josh Caswell Aug 13 '12 at 0:31
    
No, I've been under ARC for quite a while. –  Roger Gilbrat Aug 13 '12 at 0:37
1  
I don't have any suggestions but the stack trace strikes me as odd. Is it saying that the Name destructor is calling itself (frames 1 and 2)? –  Phillip Mills Aug 13 '12 at 0:50
    
@Phillip Mills don't mind that - that's how LLDB shows the stack trace (I also wonder why...) –  Max Aug 13 '12 at 1:00

1 Answer 1

When you declare a "Plain Old Data" struct in Objective-C++ that contains Objective-C objects with ARC turned on, the compiler is obligated to provide a destructor that correctly deallocates the ObjC members of the struct, even if you do not write them yourself.

This restriction does not apply in Objective-C++. However, nontrivally ownership-qualified types are considered non-POD: in C++11 terms, they are not trivially default constructible, copy constructible, move constructible, copy assignable, move assignable, or destructible. It is a violation of C++’s One Definition Rule to use a class outside of ARC that, under ARC, would have a nontrivially ownership-qualified member.

When you declared that Name structure, the compiler would have written you a destructor involving an implicit strongly held Objective-C object. At execution time, what this means is that the C++ destructor erases what it expects is a C++ structure and instead winds up borking the pointers to the string. With no valid pointer around, the -release ARC tries to send segfaults when it tries to dereference a nonexistent receiver.

When you declare an Objective-C member __unsafe_unretained, it tells ARC to exclude it from the destructor it would have to write, thus the struct is just destroyed, and the -release is never sent. It is recommended that you mark all Objective-C objects in structures or classes as __unsafe_unretained and provide the appropriate memory management yourself, because ARC can significantly complicate object lifetimes across languages.

share|improve this answer
    
"At execution time, what this means is that the C++ destructor erases what it expects is a C++ structure and instead winds up borking the pointers to the string. With no valid pointer around, the -release ARC tries to send segfaults when it tries to dereference a nonexistent receiver." I don't understand what you're trying to say here. –  newacct May 23 at 8:56

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.