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Is it possible for no override for happen? For example:

class A:
    def __init__(self, name):
        self.name = name

class B(A):
    def __init__(self, name):
        A.__init__(self, name)
        self.name = name + "yes"

Is there any way for self.name in class B to be independent from that of Class A's, or is it mandatory to use different names?

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I'm not sure what your question is. What you have here is valid code, unless you're asking whether instances of class B can have two values for self.name. The answer to that question is no. –  g.d.d.c Aug 13 '12 at 0:52
    
@g.d.d.c That's exactly what I'm asking; whether or not an instance of class B could have its own name value while still preserving the name of its superclass. Thanks for the confirmation! –  idlackage Aug 13 '12 at 0:57
    
newbie question on the OP's example: in B.__init__ he calls A.__init__ instead of what I expected, self.__init__ . The former sets the class variable name, correct? Then again, it should be the same unless an instance has a new definition of init... ? –  Matthew Cornell Sep 7 '12 at 17:51
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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Prefixing a name with two underscores results in name mangling, which seems to be what you want. for example

class A:
    def __init__(self, name):
        self.__name = name

    def print_name(self):
        print self.__name


class B(A):
    def __init__(self, name):
        A.__init__(self, name)
        self.__name = name + "yes"

    def print_name(self):
        print self.__name

    def print_super_name(self):
        print self._A.__name #class name mangled into attribute

within the class definition, you can address __name normally (as in the print_name methods). In subclasses, and anywhere else outside of the class definition, the name of the class is mangled into the attribute name with a preceding underscore.

b = B('so')
b._A__name = 'something'
b._B__name = 'something else'

in the code you posted, the subclass attribute will override the superclass's name, which is often what you'd want. If you want them to be separate, but with the same variable name, use the underscores

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