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I have a wrapper div which contans 2 divs next to each other. Above this container I have a div that contains my header. The wrapper div must be 100% minus the height of the header. The header is about 60 px. This is fixed. So my question is: how do I set the height my wrapper div to be 100% minus the 60 px?

<div id="header"></div>
<div id="wrapper">
  <div id="left"></div>
  <div id="right"></div>
</div>
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13  
I really wish w3c considers adding some value minus constant property to the width , they forgot to include the borders in the width but they should have changed the definition most of the CSS hacks would vanish if these two things were available. –  samarjit samanta Aug 26 '11 at 10:51
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8 Answers 8

up vote 63 down vote accepted

Here is a working css, tested under Firefox / IE7 / Safari / Chrome / Opera.

* {margin:0px;padding:0px;overflow:hidden}
div {position:absolute}
div#header {top:0px;left:0px;right:0px;height:60px}
div#wrapper {top:60px;left:0px;right:0px;bottom:0px;}
div#left {top:0px;bottom:0px;left:0px;width:50%;overflow-y:auto}
div#right {top:0px;bottom:0px;right:0px;width:50%;overflow-y:auto}

"overflow-y" is not w3c-approved, but every major browser supports it. Your two divs #left and #right will display a vertical scrollbar if their content is too high.

For this to work under IE7, you have to trigger the standards-compliant mode by adding a DOCTYPE :

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN"
            "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd">
<html>
<head>
<title></title>
<style type="text/css">
    *{margin:0px;padding:0px;overflow:hidden}
    div{position:absolute}
    div#header{top:0px;left:0px;right:0px;height:60px}
    div#wrapper{top:60px;left:0px;right:0px;bottom:0px;}
    div#left{top:0px;bottom:0px;left:0px;width:50%;overflow-y:auto}
    div#right{top:0px;bottom:0px;right:0px;width:50%;overflow-y:auto}
</style>
</head>
<body>
<div id="header"></div>
<div id="wrapper">
  <div id="left"><div style="height:1000px">high content</div></div>
  <div id="right"></div>
</div>
</body>
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It works in FF, but i don;t get it work under IE7. I only see 'Header' Code:<div id="header">Header</div> <div id="wrapper"> <div id="left">Left</div> <div id="right">Right</div> </div> –  Martijn Jul 28 '09 at 11:11
    
Did you trigger the standards compliant mode ? I'll add an example page in my response. –  Alsciende Jul 28 '09 at 12:31
1  
Also, if you need to position these divs in the middle of the page or anywhere else, just wrap them in a container div and set position: relative on container. Then place the container anywhere you like on the page. –  Mrchief Jul 30 '11 at 20:33
    
what about inner div, inside #left for instance if I want 2 divs with respective heights of 40% and 60%? –  TecHunter Oct 16 '13 at 9:43
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In CSS3 you could use

height: calc(100% - 60px);
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4  
Make sure you have space before and after "-" sign. Firefox need to have space before "-" sign. –  Codler Apr 22 '13 at 10:33
2  
perfect. i did not know CSS3 could do this. –  Tom Beech Aug 1 '13 at 13:57
    
Worked like a charm, thanks! –  Max Methot May 7 at 12:50
    
caniuse.com/calc - support seems to be good enough. –  MartyIX Jul 4 at 6:21
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If you need to support IE6, use JavaScript so manage the size of the wrapper div (set the position of the element in pixels after reading the window size). If you don't want to use JavaScript, then this can't be done. There are workarounds but expect a week or two to make it work in every case and in every browser.

For other modern browsers, use this css:

position: absolute;
top: 60px;
bottom: 0px;
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The site is only IE 7 compatible. When I use height: 100% and top: 60px; I still het a scrollbar. I can scroll 60px down. –  Martijn Jul 28 '09 at 9:00
4  
Don't specify a height, use top and bottom and let the browser calculate the height. –  Aaron Digulla Jul 28 '09 at 9:27
    
But I want my page to have a max height of 100% minus 60px; If the content is larger than that, I want scrollbars in the div by using overflow: scroll; –  Martijn Jul 28 '09 at 9:29
4  
For a scrollbar, add a div inside of wrapper that fills it completely and make that overflow: scroll; –  Aaron Digulla Jul 28 '09 at 9:49
    
Note that due to bugs in IE7, this might still fail. If you can't get it to work, use JavaScript. I know, you don't like it, but weight it against a week of work struggling with odd bugs. –  Aaron Digulla Jul 28 '09 at 9:50
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great one... now i have stopped using % he he he... except for the main container as shown below:

<div id="divContainer">
    <div id="divHeader">
    </div>
    <div id="divContentArea">
        <div id="divContentLeft">
        </div>
        <div id="divContentRight">
        </div>
    </div>
    <div id="divFooter">
    </div>
</div>

and here is the css:

#divContainer {
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
}
#divHeader {
    position: absolute;
    left: 0px;
    top: 0px;
    right: 0px;
    height: 28px;
}
#divContentArea {
    position: absolute;
    left: 0px;
    top: 30px;
    right: 0px;
    bottom: 30px;
}
#divContentLeft {
    position: absolute;
    top: 0px;
    left: 0px;
    width: 250px;
    bottom: 0px;
}
#divContentRight {
    position: absolute;
    top: 0px;
    left: 254px;
    right: 0px;
    bottom: 0px;
}
#divFooter {
    position: absolute;
    height: 28px;
    left: 0px;
    bottom: 0px;
    right: 0px;
}

i tested this in all known browsers and is working fine. Are there any drawbacks using this way?

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This doesn't exactly answer the question as posed, but it does create the same visual effect that you are trying to achieve.

<style>

body {
  border:0;
  padding:0;
  margin:0;
  padding-top:60px;
}

#header {
  position:absolute;
  top:0;
  height:60px;
  width:100%;
}

#wrapper {
  height:100%;
  width:100%;
}
</style>
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In this example you can identify different areas:

<html>
<style>
#divContainer {
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
}
#divHeader {
    position: absolute;
    left: 0px;
    top: 0px;
    right: 0px;
    height: 28px;
    background-color:blue;
}
#divContentArea {
    position: absolute;
    left: 0px;
    top: 30px;
    right: 0px;
    bottom: 30px;
}
#divContentLeft {
    position: absolute;
    top: 0px;
    left: 0px;
    width: 200px;
    bottom: 0px;
    background-color:red;
}
#divContentCenter {
    position: absolute;
    top: 0px;
    left: 200px;
    bottom: 0px;
    right:200px;
    background-color:yellow;
}
#divContentRight {
    position: absolute;
    top: 0px;
    right: 0px;
    bottom: 0px;
    width:200px;
    background-color:red;
}
#divFooter {
    position: absolute;
    height: 28px;
    left: 0px;
    bottom: 0px;
    right: 0px;
    background-color:blue;
}
</style>
<body >

<div id="divContainer">
    <div id="divHeader"> top
    </div>
    <div id="divContentArea">
        <div id="divContentLeft">left
        </div>
        <div id="divContentCenter">center
        </div>
        <div id="divContentRight">right
        </div>
    </div>
    <div id="divFooter">bottom
    </div>
</div>

</body>
</html>
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Use an outer wrapper div set to 100% and then your inner wrapper div 100% should be now relative to that.

I thought for sure this used to work for me, but apparently not:

<html>
<body>
<div id="outerwrapper" style="border : 1px solid red ; height : 100%">
<div id="header" style="border : 1px solid blue ; height : 60px"></div>
<div id="wrapper"  style="border : 1px solid green ; height : 100% ; overflow : scroll ;">
  <div id="left" style="height : 100% ; width : 50% ; overflow : scroll; float : left ; clear : left ;">Some text 

on the left</div>
  <div id="right" style="height : 100% ; width 50% ; overflow : scroll; float : left ;">Some Text on the 

right</div>
</div>
</div>
</body>
</html>
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Can give an example of that. I don't understand –  Martijn Jul 28 '09 at 10:00
    
I posted what I was thinking of, but I can't get it working this early/late. Maybe if I get a little more sleep. –  Cade Roux Jul 28 '09 at 10:17
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If you don't want to use absolute positioning and all that jazz, here's a fix I like to use:

your html:

<body>    
   <div id="header"></div>
   <div id="wrapper"></div>
</body>

your css:

body {
     height:100%;
     padding-top:60px;
}
#header {
     margin-top:60px;
     height:60px;
}
#wrapper {
     height:100%;
}
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1  
I don't think this works as expected. First #header should be margin-top:-60px;. Second, height:100% means that the height will be 100% of the parent elements height, not including margins, padding and borders. Depending on your scroll settings, this will either cause scroll bars to appear or your content to be cropped. –  Kylos Nov 23 '11 at 18:21
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