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I have a large text file with words that are interspersed with numbers and two types of characters, a '|' and '.'. I searched on StackOverflow and found how to take this string and only retain letters. For example, if

old_fruits='apple|0.00|kiwi|0.00|0.5369|-0.2437|banana|0.00|pear'

then

re.sub("[^A-Za-z]","",old_fruits)

would return

'applekiwibananapear'

I'm trying to write these words out to a file with one word on each line, followed by a newline and then the next word, like:

apple
kiwi
banana
pear

Any thoughts or pointing in the right direction is appreciated.

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try this:

import re

old_fruits = 'apple|0.00|kiwi|0.00|0.5369|-0.2437|banana|0.00|pear'

with open('fruits.out', 'w') as f:
    fruits = re.findall(r'[^\W\d]+', old_fruits)
    f.write('\n'.join(fruits))
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I tried that and it worked like I hoped. – Levar Aug 13 '12 at 3:49

You can do this without using regular expressions. Split the string on the pipe characters, use a generator expression and the inbuild string.isalpha() function to filter out those words that are alphabetic characters only, and join them to form the final output:

old_fruits = 'apple|0.00|kiwi|0.00|0.5369|-0.2437|banana|0.00|pear'
words = (word for word in old_fruits.split('|') if word.isalpha())
new_fruits = '\n'.join(words)

print(new_fruits)

The output is

apple
kiwi
banana
pear

as desired (not written to a file, but I assume you are able to cope with that).

Edit: knocked up a quick script to provide some timing comparison of regex vs non-regex:

import timeit

# Setup - not counted in the timing so it doesn't matter we include regex for both tests
setup = r"""old_fruits = 'apple|0.00|kiwi|0.00|0.5369|-0.2437|banana|0.00|pear'
import re
fruit_re=re.compile(r'[^\W\d]+')
"""

no_re = r"""words = (word for word in old_fruits.split('|') if word.isalpha())
new_fruits = '\n'.join(words)"""

with_re = r"""new_fruits = '\n'.join(fruit_re.findall(old_fruits))"""

num = 10000

print("Short input")
t = timeit.timeit(no_re, setup, number=num)
print("No regex: {0:.2f} microseconds to run".format((t*1e6)/num))
t = timeit.timeit(with_re, setup, number=num)
print("With regex: {0:.2f} microseconds to run".format((t*1e6)/num))

print("")
print("100 times longer input")

setup = r"""old_fruits = 'apple|0.00|kiwi|0.00|0.5369|-0.2437|banana|0.00|pear'*100
import re
fruit_re=re.compile(r'[^\W\d]+')"""

t = timeit.timeit(no_re, setup, number=num)
print("No regex: {0:.2f} microseconds to run".format((t*1e6)/num))
t = timeit.timeit(with_re, setup, number=num)
print("With regex: {0:.2f} microseconds to run".format((t*1e6)/num))

The results on my computer:

Short input
No regex: 18.31 microseconds to run
With regex: 15.37 microseconds to run

100 times longer input
No regex: 793.79 microseconds to run
With regex: 999.08 microseconds to run

So a pre-compiled regular expression is quicker on short input strings, for longer ones the generator expression is quicker (at least on my computer - Ubuntu Linux, Python 2.7 - results may vary on yours).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! That works great too. – Levar Aug 13 '12 at 4:00
1  
@Levar - updated answer to do a quick test of the speed of regex vs generator. – Blair Aug 13 '12 at 4:10
of=old_fruits.split("|")
for i in range(0,len(of),2):
 # write to file
share|improve this answer

The answer isn't that hard, and although I don't know if this is best practice, why not

print re.sub("[^A-Za-z]+","\n",old_fruits) #re.sub("[^A-Za-z]+","\n",old_fruits) is the string you want

The "+" means 1+ instances of non-alpha characters will be replaced with \n

share|improve this answer

Using OP's code as basis:

import re
old_fruits = 'apple|0.00|kiwi|0.00|0.5369|-0.2437|banana|0.00|pear'

with open('outdata.txt', 'w') as f:
    f.write('\n'.join(re.sub("[^A-Za-z]"," ",old_fruits).split()))

gives

apple
kiwi
banana
pear

in file 'outdata.txt'.

share|improve this answer
    
Dude you just put \n in, split it (taking out \n) then put them back in... – Snakes and Coffee Aug 13 '12 at 3:39
    
Why not my answer? Using + means that 1+ instance will be matched and replaced with \n. Sort of feels like that's what you were trying to do – Snakes and Coffee Aug 13 '12 at 3:42

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