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I wrote a function that takes pairwise correlations of columns in a matrix (like the built in pdist in scipy.stats) but that can handle missing values specified by the argument na_values. i.e.:

def my_pdist(X, dist_func, na_values=["NA"]):
    X = array(X, dtype=object)
    num_rows, num_cols = X.shape
    dist_matrix = []
    for col1 in range(num_cols):
        pdist_row = []
        for col2 in range(num_cols):
            pairs = array([[x, y] for x, y in zip(X[:, col1], X[:, col2]) \
                           if (x not in na_values) and (y not in na_values)])
            if len(pairs) == 0:
                continue
            dist = dist_func(pairs[:, 0],
                             pairs[:, 1])
            pdist_row.append(dist)
        dist_matrix.append(pdist_row)
    dist_matrix = array(dist_matrix)
    return dist_matrix

where dist_func is a function that specifies the distance metric. Is there a way to speed this function up? An example of using it is:

def spearman_dist(u, v, na_vals=["NA"]):
    matrix = [[x, y] for x, y in zip(u, v) \
              if (u not in na_vals) and (v not in na_vals)]
    matrix = array(matrix)
    spearman = scipy.stats.spearmanr(matrix[:, 0], matrix[:, 1])[0]
    return 1 - spearman

my_pdist(X, spearman_dist, na_values=["NA"])

how can this be vectorized/made faster?

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You could use numpy.nan() or numpy.isfinite() to get your mask instead of checking each element. I'm not clear on what you are calculating, however. Could you add a small simple example with real numbers showing inputs and outputs? –  Benjamin Aug 13 '12 at 19:19
    
Won't scipy.stats.spearmanr(X) handle numpy.nan values correctly in the first place? –  Benjamin Aug 13 '12 at 23:36
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I have a few suggestions:

  1. Don't use arrays with type 'object'. This prevents numpy from using any of its built in optimization since it is forced to operate on python objects rather than raw values. If you use float arrays, then you can use np.nan instead of 'NA'. For integer arrays it might be best to just store a mask of good/bad values in a separate array (you could also use masked arrays for this, but I find them to be a bit clumsy).

  2. I would bet that this line is taking up most of the time:

    pairs = array([[x, y] for x, y in zip(X[:, col1], X[:, col2]) \
                       if (x not in na_values) and (y not in na_values)])
    

    So you could speed up the inner loop like this:

    x1 = X[:, col1]
    x2 = X[:, col2]
    mask = ~np.isnan(x1) * ~np.isnan(x2)
    if mask.sum() == 0:
        continue
    dist = dist_func(x1[mask], x2[mask])
    
  3. Rather than building dist_matrix using list.append, start with an empty array and fill the elements as you go:

    dist_matrix = np.empty((num_cols, num_cols))
    for col1 in range(num_cols):
        for col2 in range(num_cols):
            ...
            dist_matrix[col1, col2] = dist
    
  4. Since you are iterating over range(num_cols) twice, you are actually computing most distance values twice. This could be optimized:

    dist_matrix = np.empty((num_cols, num_cols))
    for col1 in range(num_cols):
        for col2 in range(col1, num_cols):
            ...
            dist_matrix[col1, col2] = dist
            dist_matrix[col2, col1] = dist
    
  5. It may be possible to do the entire computation without any for-loops at all, but this depends on the details of dist_func.

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You could try to replace your na_vals by numpy's Masked Arrays.

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