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I would like a class C to have a static constexpr member of type C. Is this possible in C++11?

Attempt 1:

struct Foo {
    constexpr Foo() {}
    static constexpr Foo f = Foo();
};
constexpr Foo Foo::f;

g++ 4.7.0 says: 'invalid use of incomplete type' referring to the Foo() call.

Attempt 2:

struct Foo {
    constexpr Foo() {}
    static constexpr Foo f;
};
constexpr Foo Foo::f = Foo();

Now the problem is the lack of an initializer for the constexpr member f inside the class definition.

Attempt 3:

struct Foo {
    constexpr Foo() {}
    static const Foo f;
};
constexpr Foo Foo::f = Foo();

Now g++ complains about a redeclaration of Foo::f differing in constexpr.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 16 down vote accepted

If I interpret the Standard correctly, it isn't possible.

(§9.4.2/3) [...] A static data member of literal type can be declared in the class definition with the constexpr specifier; if so, its declaration shall specify a brace-or-equal-initializer in which every initializer-clause that is an assignment-expression is a constant expression. [...]

From the above (along with the fact that there is no separate statement about non-literal types in static data member declarations), I believe it follows that a static data member that is constexpr must be a literal type (as defined in §3.9/10), and it must have its definition included in the declaration. The latter condition could be satisfied by using the following code:

struct Foo {
  constexpr Foo() {}
  static constexpr Foo f {};
};

which is similar to your Attempt 1, but without the class-external definition.

However, since Foo is incomplete at the time of declaration/definition of the static member, the compiler can't check whether it is a literal type (as defined in §3.9/10), so it rejects the code.

Note that there is this post-C++-11 document (N3308) which discusses various problems of the current definition of constexpr in the Standard, and makes suggestions for amendments. Specifically, the "Proposed Wording" section suggests an amendment of §3.9/10 that implies the inclusion of incomplete types as one kind of literal type. If that amendment was to be accepted into a future version of the Standard, your problem would be solved.

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2  
+1 for keeping us abreast of the current state of discussions on top of prodiving the answer! –  Matthieu M. Aug 13 '12 at 8:52
    
it is this guys document stackoverflow.com/users/1041090/richard-smith –  Johannes Schaub - litb Aug 13 '12 at 9:17
1  
I've just come up against this exact problem. It seems inconsistent with how static const can work with incomplete types. I guess I'll just have to make do with a static const for now! –  Matt Clarkson Aug 29 '12 at 18:09
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I believe GCC is incorrect to reject your Attempt 3. There is no rule in the C++11 standard (or any of its accepted defect reports) which says that a redeclaration of a variable must be constexpr iff the prior declaration was. The closest the standard comes to that rule is in [dcl.constexpr](7.1.5)/1_:

If any declaration of a function or function template has constexpr specifier, then all its declarations shall contain the constexpr specifier.

Clang's implementation of constexpr accepts your Attempt 3.

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Perhaps, but in Attempt 3, the variable is only const and not a constexpr, isn't it? –  Ben Voigt Sep 24 '12 at 4:06
    
In Attempt 3, the variable is constexpr, because constexpr was specified in the definition. The relevant section of the standard is 5.19/2: "an lvalue-to-rvalue conversion [...may be applied to...] a non-volatile glvalue of literal type that refers to a non-volatile object defined with constexpr –  Richard Smith Sep 27 '12 at 4:38
    
Are you sure that's allowed? A static member variable can't be introduced outside the class, it first has to be declared inside the class with the same type (including cv-qualifiers). I couldn't seem to find the rule which requires that, however, in order to see whether constexpr is excluded from the signature matching. –  Ben Voigt Sep 27 '12 at 5:21
    
Ok, part of the rule is in 8.3p1: "When the declarator-id is qualified, the declaration shall refer to a previously declared member of the class or namespace to which the qualifier refers" I still can't find the bits which specify how well the type and qualifiers have to match. –  Ben Voigt Sep 27 '12 at 5:30
    
You're looking for 3.5p10: "After all adjustments of types (during which typedefs (7.1.3) are replaced by their definitions), the types specified by all declarations referring to a given variable or function shall be identical, except that declarations for an array object can specify array types that differ by the presence or absence of a major array bound". Note that constexpr adds const to the type, but is not itself part of the type. –  Richard Smith Sep 29 '12 at 4:33
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