Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i have written a program to clean some financial data i have collected over the months. it's about 100GB in total and growing everyday, and each file is about 1-2GB each. it is currently stored in a text file format.

the code below is use to clean the data:

    static void Main()
    {
        string inputString;
        string outputString;

             // others variable omitted

        string[] lineSplit;

        foreach (string fullPath in Directory.GetFiles(inputDirectory))
        {

            using (StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(fullPath))        //read from input file
            {
                while ((line = reader.ReadLine()) != null)
                {
                          //logic to clean data

                                ...

                         ///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

                    using (StreamWriter writer = File.AppendText(outputFile))
                    {
                        writer.WriteLine(outputString);
                    }
                }
            }
        }       
    }

it is very slow, i estimate for 100GB of data it will take me about 3-4 days to finish it. i know it is about my IO operation, as i have no buffer etc to do it. i am still relatively new to C# and i couldn't find any relevant example to build a proper buffer for IO. most example i find are for downloading and not applicable to reading text files. And i cant load the whole file into memory to process it as it is too big. how can i do it? can anyone give me some snippet of code i can use? thanks

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You're reopening the output file on every single line. Move the loop to inside the block which starts by calling File.AppendText:

using (TextReader reader = File.OpenText(fullPath))
{
    using (TextWriter writer = File.AppendText(outputFile))
    {
         while ((line = reader.ReadLine()) != null)
         {
             // Logic to clean data
            writer.WriteLine(outputString);
         }
    }
}

Of course this assumes you've got one output file per input file. If that's not the case - if each line can go to a different file within a small collection - you may want to keep all the output files open, and just keep a dictionary (or something similar) so you can quickly write to whichever you want.

share|improve this answer
    
random aside - Jon - did we (SE) break your tracker? Are you out of quota? –  Marc Gravell Aug 13 '12 at 6:21
    
@MarcGravell: Yup. Bizarrely enough it does show 10 points for me on Meta yesterday, but SO is a blank. I was going to try to look into it tomorrow. –  Jon Skeet Aug 13 '12 at 6:22
    
if nothing is obviously wrong at your end, do let us know which methods you're calling - I'm sure we can convince Monty to look at it ;p –  Marc Gravell Aug 13 '12 at 6:23
    
in particular, it is coming back with data: api.stackexchange.com/2.0/users/22656/… –  Marc Gravell Aug 13 '12 at 6:30
1  
@ClaytonLeung: As I said in my answer, you'd probably want to have something like a dictionary of open files. You'd need to add a try/finally block so that you'd close them all at the end though. –  Jon Skeet Aug 13 '12 at 7:17

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.