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I have a data set that is full of inappropriately spaced sentences. I'm trying to come up with a way to remove some of the spaces.

I start with a sentence that I convert to a data frame of words:

> word5 <- "hotter the doghou se would be bec ause the co lor was diffe rent"
> abc1 <- data.frame(filler1 = 1,words1=factor(unlist(strsplit(word5, split=" "))))
> abc1
   filler1 words1
1        1 hotter
2        1    the
3        1 doghou
4        1     se
5        1  would
6        1     be
7        1    bec
8        1   ause
9        1    the
10       1     co
11       1    lor
12       1    was
13       1  diffe
14       1   rent

Next I use the following code to try and spell check and combine words that are the combination of the word before or after them:

abc2 <- abc1
i <- 1
while(i < nrow(abc1)){
  print(abc2)
  if(nrow(aspell(abc1$words1[i])) == 0){
    print(paste(i,"Words OK",sep=" | "));flush.console() 
    i <- i + 1
  }
 else{
  if(nrow(aspell(abc1$words1[i])) > 0 & i != 1){
    preWord1 <- abc1$words1[i-1]
    postWord1 <- abc1$words1[i+1]
    badWord1 <- abc1$words1[i]
    newWord1 <- factor(paste(preWord1,badWord1,sep=""))
    newWord2 <- factor(paste(badWord1,postWord1,sep=""))

    if(nrow(aspell(newWord1)) == 0 & nrow(aspell(newWord2)) != 0){
      abc2[i,"words1"] <-as.character(newWord1)
      abc2 <- abc2[-c(i+1),]
      print(paste(i,"word1",sep=" | "));flush.console()
      i <- i + 1
    }

    if(nrow(aspell(newWord1)) != 0 & nrow(aspell(newWord2)) == 0){
      abc2[i ,"words1"] <-as.character(newWord2)
      abc2 <- abc2[-c(i-1),]
      print(paste(i,"word2",sep=" | "));flush.console()
      i <- i + 1
    }

  }
}
}

After playing with this for sometime I'm coming to the conclusion that I need some type of iterator but am uncertain of how to implement it in R. Any suggestions?

share|improve this question
    
Can you tell us how this doesn't work? I think you are probably looking for the sapply, or lapply functions. If you define your own function and then do lapply(abc1$words1, yourFunctionNameHere) it will loop over each element of adc1$words1 and call your function with that element passed as the parameter. If there are other parameters to pass to the function you can pass those after the function name –  Davy Kavanagh Aug 13 '12 at 9:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Note: I came up with a quite different, and much better solution as it circumvents all the downsides of the previous solution. But I would still like to keep the old solution. Therefore, I added it as a new answer, please correct me if I am wrong to do this.

In this approach I reformat the dataset a bit. The base is what I call a wordpair object. For example:

> word5
[1] "hotter the doghou se would be bec ause the col or was diffe rent"

would look like:

> abc1_pairs
    word1  word2
1  hotter    the
2     the doghou
3  doghou     se
4      se  would
5   would     be
6      be    bec
7     bec   ause
8    ause    the
9     the    col
10    col     or
11     or    was
12    was  diffe
13  diffe   rent

Next we iterate over the wordpairs and see if they are valid words themselves, recursively doing this until no valid new words are found (note that a few additional functions are listed at the bottom of this post):

# Recursively delete wordpairs which lead to a correct word
merge_wordpairs = function(wordpairs) {
  require(plyr)
  merged_pairs = as.character(mlply(wordpairs, merge_word))
  correct_words_idxs = which(sapply(merged_pairs, word_correct))
  if(length(correct_words_idxs) == 0) {
    return(wordpairs)
  } else {
    message(sprintf("Number of words about to be merged in this pass: %s", length(correct_words_idxs)))
    for(idx in correct_words_idxs) {
      wordpairs = merge_specific_pair(wordpairs, idx, delete_pair = FALSE)
    }
    return(merge_wordpairs(wordpairs[-correct_words_idxs,])) # recursive call
  }
}

Applied to the example dataset this would result in:

> word5 <- "hotter the doghou se would be bec ause the col or was diffe rent"
> abc1 = strsplit(word5, split = " ")[[1]]
> abc1_pairs = wordlist2wordpairs(abc1)
> abc1_pairs
    word1  word2
1  hotter    the
2     the doghou
3  doghou     se
4      se  would
5   would     be
6      be    bec
7     bec   ause
8    ause    the
9     the    col
10    col     or
11     or    was
12    was  diffe
13  diffe   rent
> abc1_merged_pairs = merge_wordpairs(abc1_pairs)
Number of words about to be merged in this pass: 4
> merged_sentence = paste(wordpairs2wordlist(abc1_merged_pairs), collapse = " ")
> c(word5, merged_sentence)
[1] "hotter the doghou se would be bec ause the col or was diffe rent"
[2] "hotter the doghouse would be because the color was different"    

Additional functions needed:

# A bunch of functions
# Data transformation
wordlist2wordpairs = function(word_list) {
  require(plyr)
  wordpairs = ldply(seq_len(length(word_list) - 1), 
                    function(idx) 
                      return(c(word_list[idx], 
                               word_list[idx+1])))
  names(wordpairs) = c("word1", "word2")
  return(wordpairs)
}
wordpairs2wordlist = function(wordpairs) {
  return(c(wordpairs[[1]], wordpairs[[2]][nrow(wordpairs)]))
}

# Some checking functions
# Is the word correct?
word_correct = function(word) return(nrow(aspell(factor(word))) == 0)
# Merge two words
merge_word = function(word1, word2) return(paste(word1, word2, sep = ""))

# Merge a specific pair, option to postpone deletion of pair
merge_specific_pair = function(wordpairs, idx, delete_pair = TRUE) {
  # merge pair into word
  merged_word = do.call("merge_word", wordpairs[idx,])
  # assign the pair to the idx above
  if(!(idx == 1)) wordpairs[idx - 1, "word2"] = merged_word
  if(!(idx == nrow(wordpairs))) wordpairs[idx + 1, "word1"] = merged_word
  # assign the pair to the index below (if not last one)
  if(delete_pair) wordpairs = wordpairs[-idx,]
  return(wordpairs)
}
share|improve this answer
    
@screechOwl, how did this solution perform on your dataset? Was the speed acceptable? Any additional bugs? –  Paul Hiemstra Aug 14 '12 at 16:35

What you could do is use recursion. The code below takes a slightly modified version of your example. It checks if all the words are correct, if so the list of words is returned. If not, it tries to combine the word with the preceding word, and with the word after it. If the merge of the preceding word was correct, this leads to a merger which looks like paste(word_before, word, word_after). After the attempted merger, the function to merge words is called on the new word list. This recursion continues until there are no wrong words left.

# Wrap the spell checking in a function, makes your code much more readable
word_correct = function(word) return(nrow(aspell(factor(word))) == 0)
# Merge two words
merge_word = function(word1, word2) return(paste(word1, word2, sep = ""))
# Merge two words and replace in list
merge_words_in_list = function(word_list, idx1, idx2) {
  word_list[idx1] = merge_word(word_list[idx1], word_list[idx2])
  return(word_list[-idx2])
}
# Function that recursively combines words 
combine_words = function(word_list) {
  message("Current sentence: ", paste(word_list, collapse = " "))
  words_ok = sapply(word_list, word_correct)
  if(all(words_ok)) {
    return(word_list) 
  } else {
    first_wrong_word = which(!words_ok)[1]
    combination_before = merge_word(word_list[first_wrong_word], 
                                    word_list[first_wrong_word-1])
    if(word_correct(combination_before)) {
      word_list = merge_words_in_list(word_list, first_wrong_word-1, 
                                      first_wrong_word)
    }
    combination_after = merge_word(word_list[first_wrong_word], 
                                   word_list[first_wrong_word+1])
    if(word_correct(combination_after)) {
      word_list = merge_words_in_list(word_list, first_wrong_word, 
                                      first_wrong_word+1)
    }
    return(combine_words(word_list))  # Recursive call
  }
}

Applying this set of functions to (a slightly modified) version of your sentence:

word5 <- "hotter the doghou se would be bec ause the col or was diffe rent"
abc1 = strsplit(word5, split = " ")[[1]]
combine_words(abc1)
Current sentence: hotter the doghou se would be bec ause the col or was diffe rent
Current sentence: hotter the doghouse would be bec ause the col or was diffe rent
Current sentence: hotter the doghouse would be because the col or was diffe rent
Current sentence: hotter the doghouse would be because the col or was different

Some issues:

  • There is still the problem that if both combination_before and combination_after are non-valid, the program drops into infinite recursion. The program only stops when all words are valid.
  • What if both merges with the previous word, and the next word are valid, what should we do?
  • The code only merges wrong words, e.g. 'col' and 'or' are judged good words by aspell whilst you might want to merge. This leads to a new challenge: in this case the merge is obvious, but in large datasets it might not be obvious how to combine a set of, in itself, correct words.

But nonetheless, I think this example nicely illustrates a recursive approach.

share|improve this answer
    
That's great! Thank you very much. The issues are all survivable. The data is pretty bad so even skipping scenarios where both combined words do / don't work is a big step in the right direction. –  screechOwl Aug 13 '12 at 12:56
    
I added a new answer which has none of the downsides of this solution, and I think it should faster. –  Paul Hiemstra Aug 13 '12 at 19:20

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