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I have a function below in perl

sub create_hash()
{
my @files = @_;

        foreach(@files){
         if(/.text/)
         {

         open($files_list{$_},">>$_") || die("This file will not open!");

         }
      }

}

I am calling this function by passing an array argument like below:

create_hash( @files2);

The array has got around 38 values in it. But i am getting compilation errors:

Too many arguments for main::create_hash at ....

what is the wrong that i am doing here?

my perl version is :

This is perl, v5.8.4 built for i86pc-solaris-64int
(with 36 registered patches, see perl -V for more detail)
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6  
Take off the ()? (As in sub create_hash { .. }) –  user166390 Aug 13 '12 at 6:53
    
what happens if you call your function like: create_hash( files2); (without "@" sign ) –  Arfeen Aug 13 '12 at 6:54
    
@ pst if i remove them error is : Array found where operator expected at process.pl line 71, at end of line (Do you need to predeclare create_hash?) syntax error at process.pl line 71, near "create_hash @files2" –  Vijay Aug 13 '12 at 6:59
    
@peter Wrong spot: remove at sub-declaration, not invocation. Although create_hash @files2; should still be valid without the prototype .. (did a line carry-over?) –  user166390 Aug 13 '12 at 7:00
1  
BTW, 5.8.4 is a really ancient version of Perl (although that has nothing to do with your problem). You should really consider installing a newer version. perlbrew can help with that. –  cjm Aug 13 '12 at 7:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 30 down vote accepted

Your problem is right here:

sub create_hash()
{

The () is a prototype. In this case, it indicates that create_hash takes no parameters. When you try to pass it some, Perl complains.

It should look like

sub create_hash
{

In general, you should not use prototypes with Perl functions. They aren't like prototypes in most other languages. They do have uses, but that's a fairly advanced topic in Perl.

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God bless . was breaking my head :) –  N3Xg3N Sep 5 at 12:04

May use array reference as:

sub create_hash {
    my ($files) = @_;
    foreach(@{$files)){
      ...
    }
}

create_hash(\@files2);
share|improve this answer
    
One could use array-refs, but it would still generate an error with sub create_hash() { rest_of_that_code } .. –  user166390 Aug 13 '12 at 6:59
    
@pst: not "sub create_hash() {", it's "sub create_hash {" –  cdtits Aug 13 '12 at 7:02
2  
@cdtits, while your solution works, you failed to explain why Peter's code didn't work in the first place. –  cjm Aug 13 '12 at 7:04
    
@cdtits That's my point -- the declaration is different. Switching to an array-ref is only secondary :) –  user166390 Aug 13 '12 at 7:06
    
@pst: then why comment on your use of an array reference but not mention the prototyping at all? –  Borodin Aug 13 '12 at 7:17

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