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I'm a little puzzled wth this

The following code compiles ok:

def save: Action[AnyContent] = Action {
  if (1 == 2) {
    BadRequest(toJson("something went wrong"))
  } else {
    Ok(toJson(Feature.find))
  }
}

but if I just add the return statement, I get the following:

def save: Action[AnyContent] = Action {
  if (1 == 2) {
    return BadRequest(toJson("something went wrong"))
  } else {
    return Ok(toJson(Feature.find))
  }
}

[error]  found   : play.api.mvc.SimpleResult[play.api.libs.json.JsValue] 
[error]  required: play.api.mvc.Action[play.api.mvc.AnyContent]
[error]       return BadRequest(toJson("something went wrong"))

I thought this two codes would be equivalent...

BTW, Action is a companion object, with an apply method that receives a function of the form: Request[AnyContent] => Result, and that returns an Action[AnyContent]

It seems like with the return statement, the block is returning the result of directly executing BadRequest... and Ok... instead of returning the result of passing the block to the Action object companion...

Am I right?

Note: I'm trying to find a way of getting rid of so many nested map and getOrElse

ps: sorry if the question is a little confuse, I'm confused myself...

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

These two expressions do very different things indeed!

def save: Action[AnyContent] = Action {
  if (1 == 2) {
    BadRequest(toJson("something went wrong"))
  } else {
    Ok(toJson(Feature.find))
  }
}

Here, save will return the result of Action(Ok(toJson(Feature.find))). Now,

def save: Action[AnyContent] = Action {
  if (1 == 2) {
    return BadRequest(toJson("something went wrong"))
  } else {
    return Ok(toJson(Feature.find))
  }
}

The situation here is more complicated. When return Ok(toJson(Feature.find)) is evaluated, it will return from save! That is, Ok(toJson(Feature.find)) will not be passed to Action. Instead, the execution of the method save will stop and Ok(toJson(Feature.find)) will be returned as its result -- except that this is not the type save is supposed to return, so it gives a type error.

Remember: return returns from the enclosing def.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks daniel, I discovered what you said the hard way... is there same way to have an unconditional exit from a function? that is, I'd like the return to be evaluated in the block that is passed to Action... –  opensas Aug 14 '12 at 6:48
2  
@opensas You could always define your function as a def, and then pass it as parameter to Action. –  Daniel C. Sobral Aug 14 '12 at 17:07
    
Remember: return returns from the enclosing def could you please explain what that means? –  Alexander Supertramp Dec 17 '13 at 5:05
    
@Alex That's too long for a comment. Ask a question. –  Daniel C. Sobral Dec 17 '13 at 5:27

The method you use is indeed defined in the Action companion object, but it is not the one you describe in your question, but rather:

def apply (block: ⇒ Result): Action[AnyContent]

The argument (block) is an expression of type result, that would be evaluated later on demand (by-name evaluation). It is not a function or a closure, just an expression. So you cannot return from an expression.

BTW: Using return in Scala is a code smell, and should be avoided.

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I had no idea about the difference between functions and expressions, I'll google for it... BTW, perhaps you could help me with this question, that is what started it all: stackoverflow.com/questions/11929235/… –  opensas Aug 13 '12 at 7:16
1  
@opensas The difference you should check is "function" vs. "call-by-name argument". A call-by-name starts by =>. –  paradigmatic Aug 13 '12 at 7:21
2  
@paradigmatic So what you're saying is that the return requires a value of the type of containing method (method save of type Action[AnyContent]), rather than the type expected by Action (which is type Result, or as the compiler reported SimpleResult). Or, in other words, "you cannot return from an expression", but you can (and the compiler tries to) return from a method. Makes sense, thank you. –  Richard Sitze Aug 13 '12 at 8:29

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