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def memoize
  cache = {}
  lambda { |*args| 
    unless cache.has_key?(args)
      cache[args] = self[*args]
    end
    cache [args]
  }
end

factorial =  lambda {|x| return 1 if x== 0; x*factorial[x-1];}.memoize

puts factorial.call 10

The code is from book "The ruby programming language ". But it confuse me : how can the method(memoize) apply to a lambda as its method? Can lambda followed by other lambda with dot(.) as its own method?

lambda {|x| return 1 if x== 0; x*factorial[x-1];}.memoize

BTW: The above code works in irb, but ruby interpreter encounter error as following:

memoize.rb:11: private method `memoize' called for #<Proc:0x0000000103bba018@memoize.rb:11> (NoMethodError)

Why?

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2 Answers 2

Where you're saying this:

def memoize
  #...
end

I think you mean to say this:

class Proc
  def memoize
    #...
  end
end

That would add a public memoize method to Procs and lambda { ... } (or -> { ... } in newer Rubies) gives you a Proc instance.

Now on to memoize itself. Methods return the value of their last expression and for memoize, that last expression is this:

lambda { |*args| 
  unless cache.has_key?(args)
    cache[args] = self[*args]
  end
  cache [args]
}

So memoize returns a wrapper for the Proc (self) that is a closure over cache and all this wrapper does is:

  1. Check to see if cache has an entry for the argument list in question (the Array args) .
  2. If we don't have a cached value then compute the original Proc's value (self[*args]) and store it in the cache.
  3. Return the cached value.

You can use the [] method to execute a Proc so proc.call(a, b) is the same as proc[a, b].

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This works and make sense , I see it . Thanks! –  lbaby Aug 13 '12 at 8:34

The object at the top level is main, any method defined there is added as a private instance method to Object (so they're available everywhere).

Why does it work inside a irb session? because of the context mode (also here), which is 3 by default in irb. Use for example value 0 (irb --context-mode 0), and now they will be added as private methods as usual.

It would probably be preferable for pedagogical purposes if the snippet explicitly defined which class was being modified instead of using the implicit top level.

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Private instance method of Object, no? Hence the specific error message (which I also see in irb). –  mu is too short Aug 13 '12 at 8:48
    
@mu: yeah, as private, added to the answer. The thing is, at least with irb 1.9.3p125, it adds it as public. –  tokland Aug 13 '12 at 8:53

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