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I'm learning javascript closure,I have read many examples about closure,but i still confused in why we must be use closure?

here is an example i copied from "The Good Parts"

 var myObject = function(){
   var value = 0;

   return {
        increment: function(inc){
             value += inc;
        },
        getValue: function(){
             return value;
        }
   }

 };
  var obj1 =myObject();    
  document.write(obj1.getValue()); //0
  obj1.increment(10);
  document.write(obj1.getValue());//10

But i wonder why we shouldn't write like that?

    var myObject = function(){
    var value = 0;


     this.increment= function(inc){
          value += inc;
     },
     this.getValue= function(){
          return value;
     }

  };
   var obj1 =new myObject(); 
   document.write(obj1.getValue());
   obj1.increment(10);
   document.write(obj1.getValue()); 

first time ask question,poor english,forgive me !

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Also read this: javascript.crockford.com/private.html –  jfriend00 Aug 13 '12 at 8:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

As far as the closure is concerned the syntax are equivalent.

However if you want your object to be typed you must use the second syntax.

With the first syntax you will have:

obj1 instanceof myObject === false.

Making it kind of a singleton.

Whereas the second syntax will give you :

obj1 instanceof myObject === true

Making your object an instance of myObject

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That works fine. Both methods use a closure to contain the local variable.

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Closures are helpful when you need to access a value inside an object that no longer is in scope. When you are using the code from The Good Parts, the variable value will be incremented each time you are using increment, although the function myObject has returned.

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