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I am trying to multiply two polynomials A & B each of degree 'd', in this there are basically two operations i.e. Multiply & Addition. In order to get an output polynomial 'C', how many total number of operations required? I have searched a lot and I make assumption that total multiplication operations will be 'd^2' & total additions will be '2d-1'. Therefore total operations will be (2d-1)*(d^2). is this true? or false? and how? Please suggest....

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Check your solution for d = 3. –  Ajay George Aug 13 '12 at 9:19
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I think your time would be better spent working through a few examples with pencil and paper than searching and making assumptions. Try out a few cases for d = 1, 2, 3, 4 and see if you can't figure it out for yourself. –  High Performance Mark Aug 13 '12 at 9:21
    
Thanks for make it easy for me, now i have calculated that number of multiplications is (d+1)^2 and number of additions is [(d^2)-1]. Therefore total operations will be {(d+1)^2 + [(d^2)-1]} am I on right way sir? –  Pankaj_C Aug 13 '12 at 11:28
    
@HighPerformanceMark - Thanks for make it easy for me, now i have calculated that number of multiplications is (d+1)^2 and number of additions is [(d^2)-1]. Therefore total operations will be {(d+1)^2 + [(d^2)-1]} am I on right way sir? –  Pankaj_C Aug 14 '12 at 6:50

1 Answer 1

A polynomial of degree d has d+1 coefficients. So a simple implementation would require (d+1)^2 multiplications. For very large d the number of operations can be reduced to O( d log(d)) using FFT.

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Schönhage-Strassen is an algorithm for integer multiplication; there is, however, a way to multiply polynomials in O(d log d), using FFT (the same thing that the Schönhage-Strassen algorithm uses). –  sdcvvc Aug 13 '12 at 13:32
    
@sdcvvc - you are right. Thanks. Edited the answer. –  Henrik Aug 13 '12 at 13:40

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