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is there a way to tell/force the perl compiler to cache values inside a loop?

of course I can create my values outside of the loop, but with increasing complexity of code, I find it more readable to create the values inside of the loop, although they don't change

for example:

my $key = shift;
my @input = @_;
my %output;
foreach(@input) {
    my $output_tmp = specialOperation($_);
    ...
    my $key_tmp = constantOperation($key);
    my $specialKey = specialOperation2($_,$key_tmp);
    ...
    $output{$specialKey} = $tmp;
}

$keyTmp has the same value in every iteration and I would like the compiler to cache it

in a regex you can use the o-flag
is there something similar, e.g. a keyword, to accomplish this?

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1  
Just put the call my $key_tmp = constantOperation($key); before the foreach loop. –  M42 Aug 13 '12 at 9:37
    
as mentioned that's a possibility I try to avoid –  Hachi Aug 13 '12 at 9:58
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There is not really any additional complexity introduced by altering your code as follows:

my $key_tmp = constantOperation($key);
my %output
foreach ( @input ) {
    my $output_tmp = special_operation($_);
    my $specialKey = specialOperation2($_,$key_tmp);
    $output{$specialKey} = $tmp;
}

But accepting for a moment that you have a reasonable undisclosed argument for why you wouldn't want to just do that, another possibility (if constantOperation is a pure function) is to use Memoize.

use Memoize;
memoize 'constantOperation';

my $key = shift;
my @input = @_;
my %output;
foreach( @input ) {
    my $output_tmp = special_operation;
    my $key_tmp = constantOperation($key);
    my $specialKey = specialOperation2($_,$key_tmp);
    $output{$specialKey} = $tmp;
}

The latter doesn't avoid the repeated function call, but does cause caching within the function called constantOperation, so subsequent calls with a previously used parameter will provide a cached result.

Going back to the first example, you could just move the "my" declaration out of the loop, and then within the loop use something like this: $key_tmp //= constantOperation($key);. Here's how that might look:

my $key = shift;
my @input = @_;
my %output;
my $key_tmp;
foreach( @input ) {
    my $output_tmp = special_operation;
    $key_tmp //= constantOperation($key);
    my $specialKey = specialOperation2($_,$key_tmp);
    $output{$specialKey} = $tmp;
}

And this being Perl, there's always one more way to do it. Enable the 'state' feature, and change my $key_tmp to state $key_tmp. Here's how that might look:

use feature 'state';
my $key = shift;
my @input = @_;
my %output;
foreach( @input ) {
    my $output_tmp = special_operation;
    state $key_tmp = constantOperation($key);
    my $specialKey = specialOperation2($_,$key_tmp);
    $output{$specialKey} = $tmp;
}
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1  
yes state is exactly what I was searching for. I didn't know, it's possible to use it in loops too. –  Hachi Aug 13 '12 at 10:05
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Declare $key_tmp outside the loop, then within the loop check to see if it has already been assigned before recalculating it:

my ($key, @input) = @_;
my %output;
my $key_tmp;

foreach(@input) {
    my $output_tmp = specialOperation($_);
    ...
    $key_tmp = constantOperation($key) unless $key_tmp;
    my $specialKey = specialOperation2($_,$key_tmp);
    ...
    $output{$specialKey} = $tmp;
}
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2  
that's the same way DavidO wrote with //= –  Hachi Aug 13 '12 at 10:47
    
@Hachi Not quite the same; $key_tmp = constantOpearation($key) unless $key_tmp; would fail if a possible legitimate value returned by constantOperation evaluates to Boolean 'false'. unless defined $key_tmp; would probably be more robust (and is closer in function to what I suggested). His solution here is more like $key_tmp ||= .... instead of $key_tmp //= ..... I chose the latter because I considered it less fragile. –  DavidO Aug 13 '12 at 16:03
    
and what you did is translated to unless defined $key_tmp, I know. I just wanted to say it's the same approach, not that it does the same –  Hachi Aug 14 '12 at 6:11
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