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i am currently switching to funit to fully test my rather big Fortran-Project. Is there a tool that allows me to find out which lines of my project were not yet tested? I use emacs, so is there a simple script that would allow me to easily see which parts of my file are not yet tested?

I could imagine recruiting the -prof compiler for something like that, but i am just starting out. So i definitely cannot do this on my own.

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Investigate the support that your compiler provides for code coverage. –  High Performance Mark Aug 13 '12 at 9:57
    
thanks ! that helps me a ton. Any way i can use this in emacs every compile or so, to get a quick overview while coding? –  tarrasch Aug 13 '12 at 10:09
    
I haven't got a scooby-doo about using code coverage from within emacs every compile or so which is why I'm commenting, not answering. –  High Performance Mark Aug 13 '12 at 10:13

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Depends on your compiler. I use Intel Fortran on Linux for testing purposes, and its coverage checking options. Compile and link your code with something like

ifort -g -prof-gen=srcpos ...

(Side note: parallel make does not work for me with -prof-gen option enabled) The compilation will produce some extra files in your sources directory. Run the tests, each program execution will produce a *.dyn file in you sources directory. After running all the tests execute

profmerge
proforder
codecov

This will produce a nice detailed HTML-formatted coverage report. Don't forget to delete old *.dyn and pgopti.dpi* files before running new series of tests, otherwise you will see an intersection of different coverage results.

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