Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have a bitmap and I want to crop a circular region from this bitmap. All pixels outside the circle should be transparent. How can I do this?

enter image description here

share|improve this question

10 Answers 10

up vote 97 down vote accepted

After long brainstorming I have found the solution

public Bitmap getCroppedBitmap(Bitmap bitmap) {
    Bitmap output = Bitmap.createBitmap(bitmap.getWidth(),
            bitmap.getHeight(), Config.ARGB_8888);
    Canvas canvas = new Canvas(output);

    final int color = 0xff424242;
    final Paint paint = new Paint();
    final Rect rect = new Rect(0, 0, bitmap.getWidth(), bitmap.getHeight());

    paint.setAntiAlias(true);
    canvas.drawARGB(0, 0, 0, 0);
    paint.setColor(color);
    // canvas.drawRoundRect(rectF, roundPx, roundPx, paint);
    canvas.drawCircle(bitmap.getWidth() / 2, bitmap.getHeight() / 2,
            bitmap.getWidth() / 2, paint);
    paint.setXfermode(new PorterDuffXfermode(Mode.SRC_IN));
    canvas.drawBitmap(bitmap, rect, rect, paint);
    //Bitmap _bmp = Bitmap.createScaledBitmap(output, 60, 60, false);
    //return _bmp;
    return output;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
which code you are referring? –  Altaf Oct 22 '12 at 11:40
1  
You could also do this by clipping the bitmap against a circular clipping path. You could either do this every time you draw the bitmap, which means you'd never actually create a bitmap with transparent pixels, or you could draw the clipped bitmap into a buffer that has been erased to transparent beforehand. I think either would be a bit faster and simpler than this. –  Gene Dec 1 '12 at 0:36
1  
Thanks. your code works spectacular. Now I can also crop using path (Polygon). –  DearDhruv Sep 21 '13 at 8:58
1  
This method could be made static and used in a non-instantiated utility class of similar static methods. –  Matt Logan Jan 24 '14 at 23:05
    
Yes ,its up to you whether you want it be static or not,its also depends upon the requirement. –  Altaf Jan 25 '14 at 7:44

to generate Circle from rectangles

public static Bitmap getCircularBitmap(Bitmap bitmap) {
    Bitmap output;

    if (bitmap.getWidth() > bitmap.getHeight()) {
        output = Bitmap.createBitmap(bitmap.getHeight(), bitmap.getHeight(), Config.ARGB_8888);
    } else {
        output = Bitmap.createBitmap(bitmap.getWidth(), bitmap.getWidth(), Config.ARGB_8888);
    }

    Canvas canvas = new Canvas(output);

    final int color = 0xff424242;
    final Paint paint = new Paint();
    final Rect rect = new Rect(0, 0, bitmap.getWidth(), bitmap.getHeight());

    float r = 0;

    if (bitmap.getWidth() > bitmap.getHeight()) {
        r = bitmap.getHeight() / 2;
    } else {
        r = bitmap.getWidth() / 2;
    }

    paint.setAntiAlias(true);
    canvas.drawARGB(0, 0, 0, 0);
    paint.setColor(color);
    canvas.drawCircle(r, r, r, paint);
    paint.setXfermode(new PorterDuffXfermode(Mode.SRC_IN));
    canvas.drawBitmap(bitmap, rect, rect, paint);
    return output;
}
share|improve this answer
    
i would suggest using using two imageviews in a framelayout with the top imageview with transparent circle cut out. –  diesel Jun 24 '13 at 8:19

@Gene made a comment on the answer above that suggested using clipPath as an option for cropping an image as a circle.

The following is a clean implementation of this:

    public static Bitmap GetBitmapClippedCircle(Bitmap bitmap) {

        final int width = bitmap.getWidth();
        final int height = bitmap.getHeight();
        final Bitmap outputBitmap = Bitmap.createBitmap(width, height, Config.ARGB_8888);

        final Path path = new Path();
        path.addCircle(
                  (float)(width / 2)
                , (float)(height / 2)
                , (float) Math.min(width, (height / 2))
                , Path.Direction.CCW);

        final Canvas canvas = new Canvas(outputBitmap);
        canvas.clipPath(path);
        canvas.drawBitmap(bitmap, 0, 0, null);
        return outputBitmap;
    }

This could be added to a utility class.

share|improve this answer
2  
I was just about to post very similar code. The problem is according to developer.android.com/guide/topics/graphics/hardware-accel.html, clipPath is not supported with hardware acceleration. I actually ran into that problem in an app and wondered what was going on. Newer hardware seems to fix this, however (like Google tablets). One possible further cleanup to your code: You don't need the rect-to-rect conversion when drawing the bitmap. You can just say c.drawBitmap(b, 0, 0, null);, which uses the default identity transform. –  Gene Mar 19 '13 at 1:31
    
how did you get around using clipPath while using hardware acceleration? –  domji84 Jun 6 '13 at 11:04
    
I was originally using this solution before but the output had jagged edges. The solution from @Altaf works better –  dirkoneill Mar 19 '14 at 17:15

This can be easlity done in xml as well without cropping the actual bitmap, You just need to create a circular image mask and place over your actual image. Here is the piece of code which i used:

circle.xml

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<shape xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android" android:shape="oval" >
    <gradient android:startColor="#00FFFFFF" android:endColor="#00FFFFFF"
        android:angle="270"/>
     <stroke android:width="10dp" android:color="#FFAAAAAA"/>

your_layout.xml (Ignore "android:scaleType="fitXY"" if you don't need it)

<RelativeLayout

        android:id="@+id/icon_layout"
        android:layout_width="@dimen/icon_mask"
        android:layout_height="@dimen/icon_mask"
        android:layout_alignParentLeft="true"
        android:layout_alignParentTop="true" >

        <ImageView
            android:id="@+id/icon"
            android:layout_width="@dimen/icon"
            android:layout_height="@dimen/icon"
            android:layout_centerInParent="true"
            android:scaleType="fitXY" >
        </ImageView>

        <ImageView
            android:id="@+id/icon_mask"
            android:layout_width="@dimen/icon_mask"
            android:layout_height="@dimen/icon_mask"
            android:layout_centerInParent="true"
            android:background="@drawable/circle"
            android:scaleType="fitXY" >
        </ImageView>
    </RelativeLayout>

dimen.xml


<dimen name="icon">36dp</dimen>
<dimen name="icon_mask">55dp</dimen>

enter image description here

OutPut Image View:

Hope, It might be useful for someone!!! :)

share|improve this answer
    
Seems like it's working only if image has a transparent background that is smaller than circle... –  meeDamian Oct 11 '13 at 13:25
2  
You just put an ImageView on top of another, this isn't a mask :) –  Climbatize Dec 23 '13 at 12:31
    
@Ash sure, you're right :) I's just that this way you don't really "crop" the original image, as asked by the original poster ;) –  Climbatize Mar 18 '14 at 11:12

you can use this code, it will work

public Bitmap getRoundedShape(Bitmap scaleBitmapImage) {
    int targetWidth = 110;
    int targetHeight = 110;
    Bitmap targetBitmap = Bitmap.createBitmap(targetWidth, 
            targetHeight,Bitmap.Config.ARGB_8888);

    Canvas canvas = new Canvas(targetBitmap);
    Path path = new Path();
    path.addCircle(((float) targetWidth - 1) / 2,
            ((float) targetHeight - 1) / 2,
            (Math.min(((float) targetWidth), 
                    ((float) targetHeight)) / 2),
                    Path.Direction.CCW);

    canvas.clipPath(path);
    Bitmap sourceBitmap = scaleBitmapImage;
    canvas.drawBitmap(sourceBitmap, 
            new Rect(0, 0, sourceBitmap.getWidth(),
                    sourceBitmap.getHeight()), 
                    new Rect(0, 0, targetWidth, targetHeight), new Paint(Paint.FILTER_BITMAP_FLAG));
    return targetBitmap;
}
share|improve this answer

I think this solution works better with any type of rectangle, change the pixel size if you want image small or large :

public static Bitmap getCircleBitmap(Bitmap bm) {

        int sice = Math.min((bm.getWidth()), (bm.getHeight()));

        Bitmap bitmap = ThumbnailUtils.extractThumbnail(bm, sice, sice);

        Bitmap output = Bitmap.createBitmap(bitmap.getWidth(), bitmap.getHeight(), Bitmap.Config.ARGB_8888);

        Canvas canvas = new Canvas(output);

        final int color = 0xffff0000;
        final Paint paint = new Paint();
        final Rect rect = new Rect(0, 0, bitmap.getWidth(), bitmap.getHeight());
        final RectF rectF = new RectF(rect);

        paint.setAntiAlias(true);
        paint.setDither(true);
        paint.setFilterBitmap(true);
        canvas.drawARGB(0, 0, 0, 0);
        paint.setColor(color);
        canvas.drawOval(rectF, paint);

        paint.setColor(Color.BLUE);
        paint.setStyle(Paint.Style.STROKE);
        paint.setStrokeWidth((float) 4);
        paint.setXfermode(new PorterDuffXfermode(Mode.SRC_IN));
        canvas.drawBitmap(bitmap, rect, rect, paint);

        return output;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
This one actually worked for me after hours of trying.. –  milosmns Sep 2 '14 at 14:00

I recommend adding bitmap.recycle() if you don't need it anymore, it will prevent OutOfMemory error.

share|improve this answer

Not sure this is a programming question but...

The easiest solution would be to make the outside area transparent in the source bitmap. Otherwise, you'll have to calculate which pixels are outside of the circle, and set the alpha accordingly (alpha = 0 for full transparency).

share|improve this answer
    
to be honest, I have been your way, it seems work but we cannot solve the border jaggy problem, don't you? –  VinceStyling May 9 '14 at 10:23
    
Border "jaggyness" is addressed by dithering and/or antialiasing. You could look online for some algorithms to accomplish something that seems acceptable. But keep in mind that rectangular pixels and curves will always have these issues. –  MandisaW May 13 '14 at 22:44

You Can make your imageview circular using RoundedBitmapDrawable

here is the code for achieving roundedImageview:

ImageView profilePic=(ImageView)findViewById(R.id.user_image);

//get bitmap of the image
Bitmap imageBitmap=BitmapFactory.decodeResource(getResources(),  R.drawable.large_icon);
RoundedBitmapDrawable roundedBitmapDrawable=RoundedBitmapDrawableFactory.create(getResources(), imageBitmap);
//setting radius
roundedBitmapDrawable.setCornerRadius(50.0f);
roundedBitmapDrawable.setAntiAlias(true);
profilePic.setImageDrawable(roundedBitmapDrawable);
share|improve this answer

For peaple who want the center of the rectangle (me), add this before cutting:

    public static Bitmap cropBitmapToBlock(Bitmap bitmap) {
    if (bitmap.getWidth() >= bitmap.getHeight()){
        return Bitmap.createBitmap(
                bitmap,
                bitmap.getWidth()/2 - bitmap.getHeight()/2,
                0,
                bitmap.getHeight(),
                bitmap.getHeight()
        );
    }else{
        return Bitmap.createBitmap(
                bitmap,
                0,
                bitmap.getHeight()/2 - bitmap.getWidth()/2,
                bitmap.getWidth(),
                bitmap.getWidth()
        );
    }
} 

Android Crop Center of Bitmap

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.