Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

i'm new to regex i'm trying to match a case where there are 2 digits both can be from 0-9

something along the lines of

[0-9][0-9] 

for example :

11 10 01

share|improve this question
    
Please describe your problem better: you need to match all occurrences of numbers with two digits of if the string consists of two digits only? –  daftcoder Aug 13 '12 at 11:49
3  
You should always add the language, because regex has its small differences from language to language. –  stema Aug 13 '12 at 11:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Including the @Kobi's suggestion.

(?<![0-9])[0-9]{2}(?![0-9])

Test

share|improve this answer
1  
You can also do (?<!\d)\d{2}(?!\d) - these usually look better when you reverse the logic: rubular.com/r/oXD27VErwY –  Kobi Aug 13 '12 at 12:04
    
@Kobi, great! Thanks! –  daftcoder Aug 13 '12 at 12:08
    
No problem! I really don't need credit in the answer though :) . You may want to also include a short explanation of why it works. Oh, and welcome to Stack Overflow! –  Kobi Aug 13 '12 at 12:10

What you need are word boundaries, try

\b\d{2}\b

See it here on Regexr.

\b matches a wordboundary (in a lot of languages), thats the change from a wordcharacter to a non wordcharacter. Means, the regex would match 2 digits, if there is no digit or letter before and ahead.

\d works in most regex flavours as a shortcut for [0-9], some does not support this shortcut and some use the Unicode version and match any kind of number with \d

share|improve this answer

I believe ^\d{2}(\s\d{2})+$ should fit your needs.

Test this Regex at Regex101

PS: Learn, try for your own and come to us without just the problem but with some efforts next time. :)

share|improve this answer
1  
I gave you an up for linking to Regex 101, it seriously helped me sort out my particular problem. –  voidref Jul 4 '14 at 20:44

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.